Courses

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Art Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
History

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Art Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Travis A. Jackson, Jonah Francese
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Lindsay Wright
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Lindsay Wright, Anjelica Fabro
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Material and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

Ashkan Behzadi
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

Maria Kaoutzani
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Material and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 12100 Music in Western Civilization 1: To 1750

This course, part of the Social Sciences Civ core, looks at musics in different moments of Euro-American history and the social contexts in which they originated, with some comparative views on other world traditions. It aims to give students a better understanding of the social contexts of European music over this period; aids for the basic sound structures of pieces from these different moments; and convincing writing in response to prompts based on source readings or music pieces. Our first quarter (MUS 12100 etc.) spans roughly the period between Charlemagne's coronation as Holy Roman Emperor (800 CE) and the dissolution of the Empire (1806) with the triumph of Napoleon across Western Europe.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Civics
History

MUSI 12200 Music in Western Civilization II

(HIST 127, SOSC 211)

This course, part of the Social Sciences Civ core, looks at musics in different moments of Euro-American history and the social contexts in which they originated, with some comparative views on other world traditions. It aims to give students a better understanding of the social contexts of European music over this period; aids for the basic sound structures of pieces from these different moments; and convincing writing in response to prompts based on source readings or music pieces. Our second quarter (MUS 12200 etc.) runs from the beginning of European Romanticism around 1800 to the turn of the 21st century.

Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
History/Civics

MUSI 14300 Fundamentals of Theory

This one-quarter elective course covers the basic elements of music theory, including music reading, intervals, chords, meter, and rhythm.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 15100 Harmony and Voice Leading I

The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Ability to read music. Students pick one LAB section.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 15100 Harmony and Voice Leading I

The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Ability to read music. Students pick one LAB section.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 15200 Harmony and Voice Leading II

The second quarter of this three quarter sequence explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15100

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 15200 Harmony and Voice Leading II

The second quarter of this three quarter sequence explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15101

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 15300 Harmony and Voice Leading III

The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 15300 Harmony and Voice Leading III

The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 20719 Music and Mind

This course explores research on music in the mind and brain sciences as it has developed over the past three decades. During this time, we have come to an increasingly refined understanding of the ways the brain processes sound. It remains the case, however, that not all sound is music, and in this course we will investigate how musical sound is organized to make it musical, and how this organization reflects the capacities of the human mind. Interactive lectures (Mondays and Wednesdays) and discussion sections (Fridays) will engage both scientific and humanistic literature. Among the topics the class will engage are the origins and functions of music, absolute pitch, music and memory, how music shapes emotional responses, movement and music, connections between music and images, and the relationship between music and language.

Lawrence Zbikowski, Julianne Grasso
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 20918 Listening to Movies

(CMST 28118, SIGN 26021)

This course shifts our critical attention from watching movies to listening to them. Amid a strong emphasis on cinema--ranging from musical accompaniment during the silent era to sound in experimental films, or from classical Hollywood underscoring to Bollywood musical numbers--we will consider the soundtrack of moving pictures within a growing variety of audiovisual media, including television, music videos, and computer games. Interactive lectures (Mondays and Wednesdays) and discussion sections (Fridays) combine a historical overview with transhistorical perspectives. Supplemented by screenings and readings, the course will address a variety issues and topics: aesthetic and psychological (such as representation, narration, affect); cultural and political (such as race, ethnicity, propaganda); social and economic (such as technology, production, dissemination).

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 22620 Queer Singing | Queer Spaces

(GNSE 2620)

Queer practice and identity have long been expressed through/as song. According to Ovid, it was the great singer Orpheus who first introduced same-sex relationships to the people of Thrace; in early modern Europe, men performing the role of Orpheus on the operatic stage were often eunuchs with non-normative bodies singing in a vocal range traditionally associated with the feminine. Beyond fabled musicians, though, carnal technologies of the voice have continually been implicated in historically and geographically situated paradigms of queerness. Likewise, many of the spaces in which queer peoples have found community or refuge have been associated with music or singing. What might it suggest that in the twentieth century, generations of queer communities formed around listening to and ventriloquizing the voices of Judy Garland, Maria Callas, and Madonna? How might exclusively queer spaces, like the hijra communities of the Indian subcontinent, effect the production of voice and performance of music for its inhabitants and outside observers? For which audiences are young trans* people on YouTube documenting their vocal progressions over the course of their transitions? Why have both European and Chinese operatic traditions abounded with cross-dressing for most of their histories? In this course we will investigate the broad relationship between practices of the voice and the body and consider why so many of our cultural understandings of queerness are accompanied by singing.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 23300 Intro to Soc & Cult Study of Music

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 23500 Crossing Over: Migrating and Mobile Musics

Focusing on recent processes of people transitioning and crossing over, in this course, we will study migrating and mobile musics to understand and reconsider music's interrelations with location, space, and transcultural movement. Considering music as a mobile and flexible medium highlights how musical practice shapes post-mobility settings, and inversely, how power structures and cultural processes that govern such environments shape music-making and subjectivities within it. Incited by the recent displacement of individuals and collectives from countries such as Syria, Iraq, and Libya to Europe (specifically to the German-speaking lands), we initially study musical representations such as adapted operas, mixed-ensemble performances, and plays on the streets and the web that emerged because of people's movements. The analysis of these fusions, sound experiments, ensembles and assemblies, co-performances, collaborations, and moments of cultural resistance highlights how music originating in the Arab World interacts with that happening in European sonic locales. Drawing from translational theories, migration studies, and performance studies for the analysis of musical expressions, we then interact with musicians in Chicagoan contexts to study their music-making; music which-as a result of discontinuity, transitional processes, and new contacts-is adapted, altered, and re-contextualized while acquiring new functions and meanings.

Ulrike Prager
2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 23509 Eurovision

(SIGN 26044, TAPS 23509)

Each May since 1956 popular musicians and fans from Europe gather in a European metropolis to participate in the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC), a competitive spectacle in which musicians from one nation compete against one another. Organized, funded, and broadcast by the European Broadcasting Union, the largest conglomerate of national radio and television networks in the world, the ESC is extensively participatory, creating its own communities of fans, musicians, musical producers, and ordinary citizens, who join together at all levels of society to interact with the politics and historical narratives of Europe. From the moment of heightened Cold War conflict at the birth of ESC to the refugee crisis and the rise of right-wing nationalism in the present, ESC has generated public discourse that not only reflects European and global politics, but provides a conduit for local and national citizenries to respond and shape such public discourse about gender and sexuality. The weekly work for the course draws students from across the College into the counterpoint of history and politics with aesthetics and popular culture. Each week will be divided into two parts, the first dedicated to reading and discussion of texts about European history and politics from World War II to the present, the second to interaction with music. Students will experience the ESC through close readings of individual songs and growing familiarity with individual nations with a participatory final project.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 23520 American Idols: Music, Popular Culture and Nation

What can we learn from popular music? Reebee Garofalo asserts that it is "a social and political indicator that mirrors and influences the society we all live in." In his book Audiotopia, musicologist Josh Kun further suggested that "political and cultural citizenship is configured through the performance of popular music and its reception, via acts of listening, by the people." Building upon these observations, Katherine Meizel has argued that popular talent competition shows like American Idol offer a rich and unexplored opportunity to examine such acts of listening, contending that these programs provide valuable lenses into American ideologies and narratives of Americanness. Taking up this charge, this course explores the relationship between American political, educational, social, and cultural discourses, popular culture, and musical performance through analyses of popular music competition shows such as American Idol, America's Got Talent, and The Voice. Organized thematically, the course includes units that address themes of meritocracy, democracy, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, celebrity, disability, talent and ability, and education. The class will examine specific musical performances from televised talent competitions in relation to broader academic literature, popular media coverage, fan discourse, and scholarly sources specifically addressing the talent shows. Students engage in online and in-class debates as well as designing a final project.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology
History

MUSI 25020 Opera Across Media

(SIGN 26058,CMST 24617)

Open to all undergraduates. Over the course of the last hundred and twenty years, opera and cinema have been sounded and seen together again and again. Where opera is commonly associated with extravagant performance and production, cinema is popularly associated realism. Yet their encounter not only proves these assumptions wrong but produces some extraordinary third kinds-media hybrids. It also produces some extraordinary love affairs. Thomas Edison wanted a film of his to be "a grand opera," and Federico Fellini and Woody Allen wanted opera to saturate their films. Thinking about these mutual attractions, "Opera across Media" explores different operatic and cinematic repertories as well as other media forms. Among films to be studied are Pabst's Threepenny Opera (1931), Visconti's Senso (1954), Powell and Pressburger's Tales of Hoffmann (1951), Zeffirelli's La traviata (1981), De Mille's Carmen (1915), Losey's Don Giovanni (1979), Bergman's The Magic Flute (1975), and Fellini's E la nave va (1983). No prior background in music performance, theory, or notation is needed. Students may write papers based on their own skills and interests relevant to the course. Required work includes attendance at all screenings and classes; weekly postings on Canvas about readings and viewings; attendances at a Met HD broadcast and a Lyric Opera live opera; a short "think piece" midway through the course; and a final term paper of 8-10 pages.

Martha Feldman, David Wilson, Darren Kusar
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
History

MUSI 25300 Analysis of 20th Century Music

This course introduces theoretical and analytical approaches to twentieth-century music. The core of the course involves learning a new theoretical apparatus-often called "set theory"-and exploring how best to apply that apparatus analytically to pieces by composers such as Schoenberg, Bartok, and Stravinsky. We also explore the relevance of the theoretical models to music outside of the high-modernist canon, including some jazz. The course provides an opportunity to confront some foundational questions regarding what it means to "theorize about music."

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 25600 Jazz Theory and Improvisation

This course focuses on the knowledge necessary to improvise over the chord changes of standard jazz tunes. We cover basic terminology and chord symbols, scale-to-chord relationships, connection devices, and turn-around patterns. For the more experienced improviser, we explore alternate chord changes, tritone substitutions, and ornamentations. Using techniques gained in class, students write their own solos on a jazz tune and transcribe solos from recordings. All instruments are welcome, and students should write to the instructor prior to the first class to let them know their instrument.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 25719 Disability and Design

(BPRO 28300/CHDV 28301)

Disability is often an afterthought, an unexpected tragedy to be mitigated, accommodated, or overcome. In cultural, political, and educational spheres, disabilities are non-normative, marginal, even invisible. This runs counter to many of our lived experiences of difference where, in fact, disabilities of all kinds are the "new normal." In this interdisciplinary course, we center both the category and experience of disability. Moreover, we consider the stakes of explicitly designing for different kinds of bodies and minds. Rather than approaching disability as a problem to be accommodated, we consider the affordances that disability offers for design. This course begins by situating us in the growing discipline of Disability Studies and the activist (and intersectional) Disability Justice movement. We then move to four two-week units in specific areas where disability meets design: architecture, infrastructure, and public space; education and the classroom; economics, employment, and public policy; and aesthetics. Traversing from architecture to art, and from education to economic policy, this course asks how we can design for access.

Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth-year standing

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory/Other

MUSI 26100 Introduction to Composition

Designed for beginning composers to practice and hone the nuances of their musical craft, this course introduces some of the fundamentals of music composition through a series of exercises as well as several larger creative projects. Professional musicians will perform students' exercises and compositions. This is primarily a creative, composing course. Through a combination of composition assignments, listening, discussion, analysis, and reading, we will explore and practice the fundamental aspects of music composition. Repertoire study, harmony, counterpoint, rhythm, orchestration, timbre, form, transformation, and several other pertinent essentials are included in the curriculum. This laboratory-style, practical course is interactive and discussion-based.

PQ: Any 10000-level music course or ability to read music

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 26200 Advanced Composition

This course is a continuation of MUSI 261: Introduction to Composition, and an opportunity to go deeper into creative work. The focus will be on writing new pieces while also learning about various techniques and aesthetics, with special attention on music of the last hundred years. The new works will be performed and recorded by professional musicians, with demonstrations of instruments as well. Students are encouraged to bring their own existing interests into discussions and projects, while also incorporating newly acquired ideas and inspirations. There will also be focused attention on analysis of more recent repertoire for a variety of instrumentations and configurations, addressing new ways of thinking about harmony, melody, form, timbre, orchestration, rhythm, improvisation, notation, technology, theatricality, and concept. Students will also attend rehearsals and performances of the Chicago Center for Contemporary Composition and other events on campus.

Prerequisite: MUSI 26100 or consent

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 26618 Electronic Music I

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

Bryan Jacobs
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 26618 Electronic Music I

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 26618 Electronic Music I

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 27300 Topics in the History of Western Music III

MUSI 27300 treats music since 1800. Topics include the music of Beethoven and his influence on later composers; the rise of public concerts, German opera, programmatic instrumental music, and nationalist trends; the confrontation with modernism; and the impact of technology on the expansion of musical boundaries.

MUSI 14300 or 15300. Open to non-majors with consent of instructor.

Seth Brodsky, Jack Hughes
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
History

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

MUSI 15300. Open only to students who are majoring in music.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

MUSI 15300. Open only to students who are majoring in music.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15300. Open only to students who are majoring in music.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 28620 Critical Improvisation Studies in Music

Improvisation: when we hear this term, we think of real-time performance. We think of skill, inspiration, passion. With a little more reflection, we think of the hours of preparation that lie behind every action of the improviser, the licks, tropes, and patterns. If improvisation is determined by a larger aesthetic system, how is it any different from other species of performative actions? Is improvisation only improvisation by virtue of not (yet) being on paper? The term can become so broad that it becomes unwieldy. We can name very few intrinsic characteristics of improvisation, but we know it when we see it - in other words, it is controlled by the vast network of social and cultural signs present in its performance context.
Improvisation is a Western term that has been associated in the 20th century with Black musical forms. Because of this, the term improvisation undergoes a process of racialization - representing the body as opposed to the mind, the irrational as opposed to the supposed rationality of composition. We can now easily see the presence of improvisation in other performance cultures, including European art-music. Keeping this in mind, all attempts to theorize the improvisatory should nevertheless be sensitive to its history. Can musical improvisation give us a model for newer, more egalitarian social structures? Or does the very word improvisation represent a modernist myopia, a failure to see the organizational structures that ungird musical activity?

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 31100 Tonal Analysis

This course introduces fundamental tools of tonal analysis, applied to music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, accomplished through a focus on Heinrich Schenker's influential theory of linear analysis. A portion of the course will be given over to exploring the historical and cultural context of Schenker's theory, its critical reception, and the ways it has been applied. This will be complemented by an introduction to Schenkerian techniques and the analytical resources they offer. Note: Music 31100 is conceived as a preparation and foundation for Music 31200, which will build directly upon the analytic models and repertoire introduced in Music 31100.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 31200 Tonal Analysis II

This course is a continuation of Music 31100, a study of advanced techniques in tonal analysis. Much of our work will center on Schenkerian theory, but we will also place Schenkerian approaches in dialogue with other methods, including recent approaches to Formenlebre, schema theory, and neo-Riemannian theory. We will be interested in exploring the intersections (and frictions) between these diverse analytical methods, seeking at once to develop analytical fluency in each of them and to heighten our sensitivity to the methodological issues involved in a pluralist approach to tonal analysis.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 31500 Ethnomusicology Analysis

In this proseminar in analysis we examine the concepts and structures of mode that stretch from South Asia across the Middle East to the Mediterranean. We concentrate our comparative study on Arabic maq_m, Turkish makam, Persian radif, North Indian/Hindustani r_ga, and South Indian/Karnatak r_gam. Historically, processes and patterns of exchange between classical, popular, and folk musics in these regions have shaped repertories, ideas of melody and form, vocal practice and instrumental accompaniment, improvisation and composition, bearing witness to similarities and cross-influences, no less than to distinctive local and regional music cultures. To know and understand the music cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, as well as Muslim regions of Central and East Asia, it is indispensable also to understand the practices of improvisation and composition we analyze in this proseminar.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 32600 Proseminar: 1530-1790

This course looks at themes and moments of music in Europe and the European abroad, with some comparisons of other musical traditions. Students will engage source readings, notation/improvisation, and cultural contexts, along with trans-continental links and disjunctures. Requirements include: dealing with sources, one class report, a mock single-sheet exam, and a take-home final. It is possible that we might interact with the Haymarket Opera Company's production of Monteverdi's *Poppea* in June.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 32700 Proseminar: 1800-1900

This proseminar approaches nineteenth-century European music from an evolving perspective that gained momentum during the 1990s, when American musicology became more interested in the historical context. Amid this new orientation and the exploration of new areas of research, many methods and topics have remained remarkably stable. There have been only few attempts to conceive music history and historiography in a way that reflects these new perspectives and the new themes in a more comprehensive framework. This proseminar will try to make some steps in the direction of rethinking our approach to the history and historiography of music-this time with a focus on the 19th century. We will touch on a number of important topics, but no attempt can be made to be comprehensive with respect to both repertory and scholarly literature.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 32805 Prosem in Music 1900-Present

A seminar in twentieth- and twenty-first-century western music is a terribly hoary "topic", if such a tame word can really access the taxonomic catastrophe of "what happened in/with/to western music after 1900". This is somewhat alleviated by the "pro" in proseminar: as with the other proseminars, ours is not principally a survey, but rather an engagement "with salient scholarly issues on trends and repertories" of its chosen time-period. Put another way: we'll be focusing more on how people within the last long decade think and write about music that emerged since 1900, and less on "what actually happened”* (the "content", history, or music-theoretical aspects of various repertories, styles, movements, figures). In the process, we’ll proceed conceptually and thematically rather than chronologically or via various “traditions”; in addition, we’ll explore three mutually irreducible but often interacting fields of musical production: 1) classical or “composerly” musics, 2) popular musics, and 3) jazz and improvisational idioms. We’ll maintain a dual-focus on how these fields listen to themselves (traditions, legacies, evolutions and revolutions) but also to each other (fusions, hybrids, crossovers) and to their other (in many cases non-Western) others.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
History

MUSI 33000 Proseminar: Ethnomusiclogy

This course's goal is to introduce graduate students to the history, development and theoretical underpinnings of ethnomusicology as a research discipline. In our readings, therefore, we will focus our attention on key figures and institutions, especially from the late 19th century forward; on major issues and debates in and beyond ethnomusicology; on the relationships between ethnomusicology and other research disciplines; and on emergent emphases and concerns in ethnomusicological work.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 23100/33100 Jazz

This survey charts the history and development of jazz from its earliest origins to the present. Representative recordings in various styles are selected for intensive analysis and connected to other musics, currents in American and world cultures, and the contexts and processes of performance. The Chicago Jazz Archive in Regenstein Library provides primary source materials. PQ: Any 10000-level music course or ability to read music.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 33714 Intro to World Music

This course has two goals: (1) to introduce graduate students to the broad theoretical underpinnings of ethnomusicology as a research discipline and (2) to help students gain facility with the resources and perspectives that might enable them to teach a quarter- or semester-long undergraduate course on the musics of the world. As such, the readings and assignments focus on canonic materials and areas for ethnomusicological study including, but not limited to, major monographs, recorded collections and reference works examining the musics of East, Southeast and South Asia; Africa; Europe; and the Americas. Each student will be responsible for presenting brief overviews of key texts and recordings as well as devising two syllabi and a sample lecture outline by the end of the quarter.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 33800 Ethnographic Methods

Ethnographic methods generally pertain to the principal qualitative research methods of participant observation, fieldnote writing, ethnographic interviewing, and the ethnographer's participation in music and dance as formal and informal processes for the study of musical actions and behaviors. This seminar examines these methods, while critically considering the central connections between methods and the ethics of fieldwork and ethnographic representation as related to ethnographic intent, researcher reflexivity, notions of power and privilege, authority, hearing and representing individual voices, and politics of positionality, which refers to the ethnographer's conduct throughout the research and writing process. Selected ethnomusicological and anthropological scholarship on ethnography and (recent) musical ethnographies highlight such ethical concerns and responsibilities while introducing fieldwork settings, analytical renderings, and theoretical framing. Focusing on ethnography as methodological practice, and as text, this seminar includes writing labs to practice processes of data analysis, interpretation, and the transformation of field data into written and other ethnographic representations. The seminar further introduces fieldwork technology, visual sociology/ethnography, filmmaking, and examples of virtual ethnographic presentation and dissemination. Focusing on how scholars represent musical experiences further exposes methods and theories of critical ethnography, auto-ethnography, and performance ethnography while highlighting examples of music-making that center not only on artistic activity but also on social interactions.

Ulrike Prager
2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 34100 Composition Seminar

Student and faculty composers meet weekly for composition seminars to discuss issues related to musical materials, imagination, design, aesthetics, and compositional techniques with leaders in the field from across the globe.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 34100 Composition Seminar

The composition seminar is a weekly session designed for graduate students in composition. It is an open forum for composers to listen to recent music, including their own, and to discuss issues connected with trends, esthetics, and compositional techniques. The entire composition faculty takes part in these sessions. The composition seminar often hosts well-known visiting composers whose works are performed in the city by various groups or ensembles, as well as performers specializing in new music and contemporary techniques.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 34100 Composition Seminar

The composition seminar is a weekly session designed for graduate students in composition. It is an open forum for composers to listen to recent music, including their own, and to discuss issues connected with trends, esthetics, and compositional techniques. The entire composition faculty takes part in these sessions. The composition seminar often hosts well-known visiting composers whose works are performed in the city by various groups or ensembles, as well as performers specializing in new music and contemporary techniques.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 25820/35820 Analysis of String Quartet

This course focuses on the genre of the string quartet mostly in the 18th and 19th centuries. We will analyze quartets by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, and Bartók using several different methodologies. Students will become proficient in analyzing metric, harmonic, formal aspects of the musical language, as well as be able to articulate the development of this venerable genre.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 26720/36630 Musical Robotics

(DIGS 20015, DIGS 30015)

Musical Robotics is a skills and discussion-based class for students interested in learning analog and digital electronics to build robotic musical instruments or sound art installations. Discussions will be organized around readings related to art and technology with a special focus on sound-based works. Students will learn to program Arduinos to control DC motors, solenoids, and servos with music applications like Logic Pro and Max/MSP. As a final project students will present a new instrument they've created or plans for an art installation featuring a kinetic sculpture element.

Bryan Jacobs
2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Composition

MUSI 26715/36720 16th C. Counterpoint

In 16th century counterpoint students will write traditional species counterpoint as studied by composers for centuries, but with an ear bent towards the actual style of Palestrina and other Renaissance masters. In addition to critiquing their own exercises, students will analyze Renaissance counterpoint through listening, score-study, and fill-in-the-voice puzzles. Not only will students be able to recognize and discuss the effects of traditional counterpoint on composers from Victoria to Stravinsky, they will also discuss the elusive question of what makes good counterpoint… good, regardless of style. 

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 41220 Making Medieval Motets: Materiality, Intertextuality, and Compositional Craft

This course explores current understandings of the medieval motet, in the wake of a flurry of recent scholarly interventions in monographs by David Rothenberg (2011), Emma Dillon (2012), Jennifer Saltzstein (2013), Anna Zayaruznaya (2015 and 2018), Catherine A. Bradley (2018), and Karen Desmond (2018). The new genre of the motet emerged in early thirteenth-century Paris in the cultural circles surrounding Notre Dame Cathedral and the burgeoning Parisian University. It represented a radically new form of polyphonic composition that frequently combined sacred and secular elements and traditions to sometimes shocking and ironic effect. Beginning with largely anonymous motet creations in the thirteenth century, which often borrowed and/or re-texted pre-existing materials, the course concludes with the carefully-curated 'complete works' collections overseen by Guillaume de Machaut in the mid fourteenth century. Through readings that span a diverse range of scholarly approaches-from sound studies to the study of musical monsters-we will investigate motets ca. 1200-1350 from various angles, engaging with questions of cultural contexts, audiences, and manuscript production; musical chronologies, quotations, and notations; the sonic impact of polytextuality; intertextuality and textual hermeneutics; authorship and authoriality.

Catherine Bradley
2019-2020 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 42120 Music and the Global Migration Crisis

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 42220 Racialization and Music

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 43720 Music and Affect

This seminar will review recent work in affect theory and its application to musical practice. It will also explore how theoretical perspectives on relationships between music and the emotions, beginning in the eighteenth century and extending through to the twenty-first, suggest reformulations both to affect theory and to the way it might be applied to music. Seminar discussions will be focused on readings from affect theory, the history of music theory, music psychology, and cognitive psychology, and detailed consideration of musical works from a range of musical traditions.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Theory

MUSI 45020 Errant Voices: Performances Beyond Measure

(GNSE, RLL, TAPS?)

Listening to trans*, raced, and castrato voices, "Errant Voices: Gender and Performances beyond Measure" will explore voices that escape their confines perforce or by choice, trying to make sense of resistant, insurgent, and resilient voices. Students from various disciplines are invited to join the seminar, thereby helping to advance its themes but working from their own strengths and orientations. Our common goal will be to develop shared theoretical language among differing cases that can lead to new insights into wider paradigmatic shifts across gender and race in our historical moment. The project turns on performances inasmuch as they reveal the workings of bodies, intentions, and interactions. It depends on collective thinking because it is intersectional and thus concerns emergent shared languages developed by encountering questions collaboratively.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
History