Courses

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Andrei Pohorelsky
2020-2021 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Jonah Francese
2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Anjelica Fabro
2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Material and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 12200 Music in Western Civilization

(HIST 127, SOSC 211)

This course, part of the Social Sciences Civ core, looks at musics in different moments of Euro-American history and the social contexts in which they originated, with some comparative views on other world traditions. It aims to give students a better understanding of the social contexts of European music over this period; aids for the basic sound structures of pieces from these different moments; and convincing writing in response to prompts based on source readings or music pieces. Our second quarter (MUS 12200 etc.) runs from the beginning of European Romanticism around 1800 to the turn of the 21st century.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
History/Theory

MUSI 15200 Harmony and Voice Leading II

The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 15200 Harmony and Voice Leading II

The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 17000 University Chorus

The University Chorus is the largest vocal ensemble on campus. Its season includes an annual production of Handel's Messiah as well as presentations of choral masterworks such as Berlioz's Roméo et Juliette, Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, and Verdi's Messa da requiem. Among its 80 to 100 members are undergraduates, graduates, faculty and staff members, and singers from the Hyde Park and University community: The result is a wonderfully diverse group of vocalists, collaborating in performances of monuments of the literature. The University Chorus presents three to four concerts per season, culminating in a festive year-end performance with the combined choirs and the University Symphony Orchestra.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17001 Motet Choir

As the premier undergraduate choral ensemble at the University of Chicago, the Motet Choir accepts 28-36 singers each year. Concentrating on a cappella masterworks of all periods, this polished vocal ensemble specializes in music of the Renaissance and also performs historically and culturally diverse repertoire ranging from Gregorian chant to gospel standards. The Motet Choir presents at least three major concerts per year (one each quarter) and sings at convocations and special events on campus and throughout the Chicago area. The ensemble goes on tour every second year, often during the University's spring break.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17002 Women's Ensemble

The Women's Ensemble is made up primarily of undergraduate women at the University of Chicago. We explore classical repertoire from the Medieval era up through the present day and music from polyphonic singing traditions across the world, including South Africa, Zimbabwe, the Republic of Georgia, Croatia, Bulgaria, Sweden, and Norway, as well as a variety of American singing traditions. Through diverse repertoire, we strive to bring our voices together in powerful ways.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17003 Rockefeller Chapel Choir

The Rockefeller Chapel Choir and its professional subset, the Decani, sing at Sunday services and festivals throughout the academic year and also in Rockefeller's signature Quire & Place concert series, presenting major works from the entire historical canon, lesser-known gems, and the premières of new work by distinguished composers. The choir's members come from diverse spiritual and cultural backgrounds, sharing together the rich musical experience of singing an array of choral music in the unique religious and cultural contexts of a chapel to which students of all world traditions are drawn.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17010 University Symphony Orchestra

The 100-member University Symphony Orchestra presents an ambitious season of six major concerts per year (two each quarter). Known for its imaginative presentations of unusual repertoire as well as for its powerful performances of major symphonic literature, the University Symphony opens each year with a costumed Halloween concert-a family-friendly event enhanced by storytelling, dancing, and special effects-and closes with a celebratory year-end collaboration with the combined choirs. Repertoire generally encompasses 19th- and 20th-century works written for large orchestral forces, including masterpieces by Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorák, Mahler, Shostakovich, Sibelius, Vaughan Williams, and more. In recent years the USO has presented several silent films with live orchestral accompaniment, including Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin, and performed with acclaimed professional soloists every season. USO string sections are coached by the Pacifica Quartet. Membership is chosen on the basis of competitive auditions, and includes both undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff, alumni, and some community members.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17011 University Chamber Orchestra

The University Chamber Orchestra is a 40-member ensemble of strings, woodwinds, and horns that specializes in Baroque, Classical, and 20th-century repertoire for smaller orchestra. The group presents three concerts per year, often pairing a major symphony by Mozart or Haydn with an overture, suite, or concerto for similar forces. The Chamber Orchestra also serves as the pit orchestra for the Music Department's annual collaboration with the Gilbert & Sullivan Opera Company.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17012 University Wind Ensemble

The University Wind Ensemble is an auditioned group of fifty to sixty instrumentalists with a diverse range of musical interests and experience. The UWE presents one concert per quarter, after an intensive preparation period of six to seven weeks. With a focus on modern literature conceived specifically for the wind ensemble medium, the UWE provides its members with an opportunity to perform music by such renowned wind composers as Malcolm Arnold, Percy Grainger, Gustav Holst, and Frank Ticheli, as well as transcriptions of orchestral masterpieces by J. S. Bach, Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, and others. Membership includes talented undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, staff, and community members who are dedicated to bringing a wide array of music to the University community.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17020 Early Music Ensemble

The Early Music Ensemble is an historically oriented performance and study group led by members of the Newberry Consort. Participation in the group is open to anyone in the University community with music-reading experience; private lessons and coaching in voice and early instruments are likewise available through the Newberry Consort. Repertoire is drawn from 15th- to 17th-century sources, with special emphasis given to historically informed performance practices such as reading from original notation, improvisation, and ornamentation. The Early Music Ensemble also provides a forum for undergraduate majors and graduate students in Music who wish to explore repertories particular to their scholarly research. Collaborations with professional performers take place throughout the year, culminating in the Early Music Ensemble's year-end spring concert.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17021 Jazz X-tet

Lauded for its boldness in showcasing cutting-edge compositions, the Jazz X-tet is a versatile collection of 12 to 15 musicians, frequently joined in performance by noted Chicago-area professionals. The X-tet's three-concert season offers a variety of pieces, from jazz standards to hip-hop, often in arrangements that are custom-designed for the ensemble by its own members. In rehearsal and performance, the X-tet focuses on developing the improvisational skills of its musicians, as well as on deepening their understanding of the wide-ranging jazz idiom. The group has issued two CDs and frequently performs for University events on campus and elsewhere in the city. In addition to the Jazz X-tet itself, several small jazz combo groups are set up each year to provide training and experience to interested musicians and to perform informally on campus.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17022 Jazz Combo

In addition to the Jazz X-tet, several small jazz combo groups are set up each year to provide training and experience to interested musicians and to perform informally on campus.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17023 Middle East Music Ensemble

The Middle East Music Ensemble explores a variety of classical, neo-classical, and popular musical forms from throughout the Middle East, encompassing compositional and improvisational techniques unique to non-Western musical culture. Members perform on traditional instruments, often in company with noted guest artists, and present multiple concerts both on and off campus. No previous experience in the genre is required, but the ability to read music is necessary. Membership includes students, faculty, and staff of the University, as well as community members interested in the art and music of the Middle East.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17025 South Asian Music Ensemble

The South Asian Music Ensemble explores a variety of classical, vernacular, and popular song repertories from the Indian Subcontinent, with membership open to beginners as well as to more experienced performers with a background in South Asian music. The ensemble will focus on teaching vocal techniques, stylistic features, compositional forms, improvisational practices, and performance conventions specific to India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and South Asian diasporas. In addition to participating in weekly ensemble rehearsals, members will have the option of attending voice coaching sessions and/or engaging the instructor for private lessons. Membership is open to students, faculty, and staff of the University, as well as community members interested in South Asian music.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17026 Chamber Music Program

For the 2020-2021 academic year, new procedures are in place. Returning undergraduate and graduate students may register for participation in the same ensemble(s) in which they participated last season. Students new to the University community should first sign up for an audition through the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu. Auditions will take place during Week 1 of Autumn Quarter, via remote format. Students will be placed in an appropriate ensemble after their audition, and can then sign up for the course. Expectations for each performance course will be outlined at the first meeting of each ensemble, which will take place during Week 2. Once registered, students may drop or withdraw from the course after consultation with the director, as they would for any other course, on their my.uchicago page. Performance courses receive 0 units of credit. For more information about auditions and ensembles, see the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17027 Piano Program

For the 2020-2021 academic year, new procedures are in place. Returning undergraduate and graduate students may register for participation in the same ensemble(s) in which they participated last season. Students new to the University community should first sign up for an audition through the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu.Auditions will take place during Week 2 of Autumn Quarter in the Logan Center for the Arts. Expectations for each performance course will be outlined at the first meeting of each ensemble, which will take place during Week 2. Once registered, students may drop or withdraw from the course after consultation with the director, as they would for any other course, on their my.uchicago page. Performance courses receive 0 units of credit. For more information about auditions and ensembles, see the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17028 Vocal Studies Program

For the 2020-2021 academic year, new procedures are in place. Returning undergraduate and graduate students may register for participation in the same ensemble(s) in which they participated last season. Students new to the University community should first sign up for an audition through the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu. Auditions will take place during Week 1 of Autumn Quarter, via remote format. Students will be placed in an appropriate ensemble after their audition, and can then sign up for the course. Expectations for each performance course will be outlined at the first meeting of each ensemble, which will take place during Week 2. Once registered, students may drop or withdraw from the course after consultation with the director, as they would for any other course, on their my.uchicago page. Performance courses receive 0 units of credit. For more information about auditions and ensembles, see the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 17029 Percussion Ensemble

For the 2020-2021 academic year, new procedures are in place. Returning undergraduate and graduate students may register for participation in the same ensemble(s) in which they participated last season. Students new to the University community should first sign up for an audition through the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu. Auditions will take place during Week 1 of Autumn Quarter, via remote format. Students will be placed in an appropriate ensemble after their audition, and can then sign up for the course. Expectations for each performance course will be outlined at the first meeting of each ensemble, which will take place during Week 2. Once registered, students may drop or withdraw from the course after consultation with the director, as they would for any other course, on their my.uchicago page. Performance courses receive 0 units of credit. For more information about auditions and ensembles, see the Music Department website: music.uchicago.edu

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Performance

MUSI 23300 Introduction to the Social and Cultural Study of Music

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 25600 Jazz Theory

This course focuses on the knowledge necessary to improvise over the chord changes of standard jazz tunes. We cover basic terminology and chord symbols, scale-to-chord relationships, connection devices, and turn-around patterns. For the more experienced improviser, we explore alternate chord changes, tritone substitutions, and ornamentations. Using techniques gained in class, students write their own solos on a jazz tune and transcribe solos from recordings. All instruments are welcome, and students should write to the instructor prior to the first class to let them know their instrument.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 26618 Electronic Music I

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 27200 Topics in the History of Western Music II

MUSI 27200 addresses topics in music from 1600 to 1800, including opera, sacred music, the emergence of instrumental genres, the codification of tonality, and the Viennese classicism of Haydn and Mozart.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 25100/30809 18th Century Music Analysis

This course focuses on the compositional norms of the "galant" and "high classical" styles of the eighteenth century, especially the instrumental music of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. We will approach this repertoire from different angles, engaging literature on Formenlehre, schema theory, rhythm and meter, and topic theory. Ultimately, we will explore how conventions and deviations thereof participate in the construction of musical meaning and expression.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 21800/31800 Conducting

This two-quarter course will provide a conceptual and practical introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted particularly toward graduate students in Music Composition, but it is open to advanced musicians with orchestral performance experience as well. Ideally, students enrolled in the course should have had some experience playing or singing in a performance ensemble, and/or have a basic familiarity with orchestral instruments and traditional repertoire. Proficiency in sightreading, ear-training, and basic keyboard skills are prerequisites for the course, but will not be specifically included in the curriculum.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 32400 Proseminar: 1450-1600

This course examines issues and contexts for European music in the period, concentrating on cultural meaning, transmission, improvisation, and sources. Students will do work with digital editions of Renaissance music, interactions between Europe and the Americas, and problems of gender and music.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
History

MUSI 23410/33410 Israel/Palestine

Historically one of the most complex and contested regions in the world, Israel/Palestine has a music culture that bears witness to processes of connection and separation. The politics of music in Israel/Palestine grow from conflicted beliefs about authenticity and ownership, the sounds of difference and sameness. The sacred and the secular intersect, and boundaries of practice and genre both divide and unite. Local practices have never been independent of global movement, be it in diaspora, pilgrimage, or the distant residence of refugees. The musical landscape of the region, therefore, has shifted throughout history, accessible primarily through the archaeology of music scholarship. In this proseminar we shall look at specific moments when the musics of Israel/Palestine converged, responding to and shaping historical change and conflict. We shall explore musical repertories and practices of all kinds, whether sacred or secular, vernacular or élite.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 33900 Music Anthropology

This course is a selective introduction to anthropology and related, influential strands of high/critical theory, on one hand, and the changing relation of both to the study of music and the field of ethnomusicology, on the other. After an opening situating the course's origin and content in university and broader intellectual currents, we will proceed through a series of modules focused on particular issues and approaches: culture; society; research paradigms and theory; ethnography; intellectual crises and questions; the emergent field known as sound studies; and, finally, anthropological studies of art and music. Rather than providing a comprehensive survey, then, this course presents students with a series of paths they might fruitfully explore further, a set of tools for navigating the heterogeneous, distributed nature of fields with ever-proliferating sub-fields and research/writing paradigms.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 34100 Composition Seminar

The composition seminar is a weekly session designed for graduate students in composition. It is an open forum for composers to listen to recent music, including their own, and to discuss issues connected with trends, esthetics, and compositional techniques. The entire composition faculty takes part in these sessions. The composition seminar often hosts well-known visiting composers whose works are performed in the city by various groups or ensembles, as well as performers specializing in new music and contemporary techniques.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 34600 Orchestration

Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon
2020-2021 Winter
Category
Composition

MUSI 37100 History of Music Theory I

In this pro-seminar we will survey some major themes that emerge in pre-modern music theory (antiquity to about 1700). Among the topics we will study are the nature and classification of mode, classical canonics (interval theory), rhythm and mensuration, discant and contrapunctus theory, tuning and temperament, and the "periphery" of music theory: musica humana, magic, and the emergence of modern science. (These latter topics will indeed help us critically scrutinize just what we might mean by "music theory" when considered historically.)

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to assist students (typically in their third year) in crafting a dissertation proposal, gaining critical feedback from their peers, and honing compelling research projects. The meeting schedule of the seminar will be flexible: beginning in the fourth week of Autumn term, we will meet about once every two weeks; it may be, however, that we pick up the tempo a bit during Winter term, such that during Spring term we can slow it down a bit to allow students more time to work with their advisors on the formulation of their research projects. Once I know the schedule of the Department workshops I will schedule the meetings of the DPS to avoid conflicts with classes, workshops and other events, and distribute an initial assignment for reading and discussion.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology;History/Theory

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to assist students (typically in their third year) in crafting a dissertation proposal, gaining critical feedback from their peers, and honing compelling research projects. The meeting schedule of the seminar will be flexible: beginning in the fourth week of Autumn term, we will meet about once every two weeks; it may be, however, that we pick up the tempo a bit during Winter term, such that during Spring term we can slow it down a bit to allow students more time to work with their advisors on the formulation of their research projects. Once I know the schedule of the Department workshops I will schedule the meetings of the DPS to avoid conflicts with classes, workshops and other events, and distribute an initial assignment for reading and discussion.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology;History/Theory

MUSI 41519 Disseration Pre-Proposal Seminar

The Dissertation Pre-Proposal Seminar (DPPS) is a yearlong course required of all first- and second-year students in the Department of Music. The DPPS provides Ph.D. students in all sub-disciplines—history/theory, ethnomusicology, and composition—with methods and approaches to guide them in the early stages of preparing for the dissertations or, in the case of composers, their minor-field papers. In the course of the year, students will read and examine dissertations and the proposals that led to them. Students develop a fuller understanding of what kinds of research can be helpful in the first and second years, for example, whether short-term visits to archives or ethnographic work might assist them in identifying the empirical materials they will use. At various times during the year, we workshop some of the written work that students prepare as the subjects of their dissertations become clearer.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology;History/Theory

MUSI 41520 Dissertation Chapter Seminar

During the five three-hour sessions of the Dissertation Chapter Seminar each quarter, Ph.D. students in their fourth and fifth years will have the opportunity to share strategies for writing up their dissertations during the years of most intensive research. We shall work collectively to develop these strategies, investigating the on-the-ground research work that students bring to the DCS from the early stages of research to the completion of chapters in preparation for the dissertation-completion year. Each session will begin with a discussion of research-to-writing strategies, and it will conclude with discussion in the seminar of one or two pre-circulated chapters by students in the DCS. Ph.D. students who are not in residence during their fourth and fifth years, because they are conducting research or no longer in residence in Chicago, will participate remotely. During the Autumn Quarter of 2020/2021, the DCS will be entirely remote. The DCS provides students an opportunity for a sustained and supportive dissertation-writing workshop for Ph.D. students in Music.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology;History/Theory

MUSI 41521 Graduate Teaching Forum in Music

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology;History/Theory

MUSI 45920 Music Theory in/and the Black Radical Tradition

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Theory

MUSI 47920 Seminar: Race, place, and gender in American country music

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Ethnomusicology