Courses

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Music

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

(CRES 10200)

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

(CRES 10200)

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

(CRES 10200)

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

(CRES 10200)

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music: Materials and Design

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music: Analysis and Criticism

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 14300 Music Theory Fundamentals

This course will meet asynchronously; attendance at any scheduled lectures and tutorials is completely optional and will have no bearing upon the student’s grade. Lectures will be given live and scheduled at times that accommodate the majority of students’ schedules. They may be attended via Zoom, but they will be recorded and made available for viewing at each student’s leisure. Further optional tutorials will be scheduled at student’s best convenience. Once again, attendance is not compulsory and will have no bearing upon the course grade.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 15300 Harmony and Voice Leading III

The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 15300 Harmony and Voice Leading III

The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 17000 University Chorus

The University Chorus is the largest vocal ensemble on campus. Its season includes an annual production of Handel's Messiah as well as presentations of choral masterworks such as Berlioz's Roméo et Juliette, Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, and Verdi's Messa da requiem. Among its 80 to 100 members are undergraduates, graduates, faculty and staff members, and singers from the Hyde Park and University community: The result is a wonderfully diverse group of vocalists, collaborating in performances of monuments of the literature. The University Chorus presents three to four concerts per season, culminating in a festive year-end performance with the combined choirs and the University Symphony Orchestra.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17001 Motet Choir

As the premier undergraduate choral ensemble at the University of Chicago, the Motet Choir accepts 28-36 singers each year. Concentrating on a cappella masterworks of all periods, this polished vocal ensemble specializes in music of the Renaissance and also performs historically and culturally diverse repertoire ranging from Gregorian chant to gospel standards. The Motet Choir presents at least three major concerts per year (one each quarter) and sings at convocations and special events on campus and throughout the Chicago area. The ensemble goes on tour every second year, often during the University's spring break.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17002 Women's Ensemble

The Women's Ensemble is made up primarily of undergraduate women at the University of Chicago. We explore classical repertoire from the Medieval era up through the present day and music from polyphonic singing traditions across the world, including South Africa, Zimbabwe, the Republic of Georgia, Croatia, Bulgaria, Sweden, and Norway, as well as a variety of American singing traditions. Through diverse repertoire, we strive to bring our voices together in powerful ways.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17003 Rockefeller Chapel Choir

The Rockefeller Chapel Choir and its professional subset, the Decani, sing at Sunday services and festivals throughout the academic year and also in Rockefeller's signature Quire & Place concert series, presenting major works from the entire historical canon, lesser-known gems, and the premières of new work by distinguished composers. The choir's members come from diverse spiritual and cultural backgrounds, sharing together the rich musical experience of singing an array of choral music in the unique religious and cultural contexts of a chapel to which students of all world traditions are drawn.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17010 University Symphony Orchestra

The 100-member University Symphony Orchestra presents an ambitious season of six major concerts per year (two each quarter). Known for its imaginative presentations of unusual repertoire as well as for its powerful performances of major symphonic literature, the University Symphony opens each year with a costumed Halloween concert-a family-friendly event enhanced by storytelling, dancing, and special effects-and closes with a celebratory year-end collaboration with the combined choirs. Repertoire generally encompasses 19th- and 20th-century works written for large orchestral forces, including masterpieces by Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorák, Mahler, Shostakovich, Sibelius, Vaughan Williams, and more. In recent years the USO has presented several silent films with live orchestral accompaniment, including Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin, and performed with acclaimed professional soloists every season. USO string sections are coached by the Pacifica Quartet. Membership is chosen on the basis of competitive auditions, and includes both undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff, alumni, and some community members.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17011 University Chamber Orchestra

The University Chamber Orchestra is a 40-member ensemble of strings, woodwinds, and horns that specializes in Baroque, Classical, and 20th-century repertoire for smaller orchestra. The group presents three concerts per year, often pairing a major symphony by Mozart or Haydn with an overture, suite, or concerto for similar forces. The Chamber Orchestra also serves as the pit orchestra for the Music Department's annual collaboration with the Gilbert & Sullivan Opera Company.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17012 University Wind Ensemble

The University Wind Ensemble is an auditioned group of fifty to sixty instrumentalists with a diverse range of musical interests and experience. The UWE presents one concert per quarter, after an intensive preparation period of six to seven weeks. With a focus on modern literature conceived specifically for the wind ensemble medium, the UWE provides its members with an opportunity to perform music by such renowned wind composers as Malcolm Arnold, Percy Grainger, Gustav Holst, and Frank Ticheli, as well as transcriptions of orchestral masterpieces by J. S. Bach, Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, and others. Membership includes talented undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, staff, and community members who are dedicated to bringing a wide array of music to the University community.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17020 Early Music Ensemble

The Early Music Ensemble is an historically oriented performance and study group led by members of the Newberry Consort. Participation in the group is open to anyone in the University community with music-reading experience; private lessons and coaching in voice and early instruments are likewise available through the Newberry Consort. Repertoire is drawn from 15th- to 17th-century sources, with special emphasis given to historically informed performance practices such as reading from original notation, improvisation, and ornamentation. The Early Music Ensemble also provides a forum for undergraduate majors and graduate students in Music who wish to explore repertories particular to their scholarly research. Collaborations with professional performers take place throughout the year, culminating in the Early Music Ensemble's year-end spring concert.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17021 Jazz X-tet

Lauded for its boldness in showcasing cutting-edge compositions, the Jazz X-tet is a versatile collection of 12 to 15 musicians, frequently joined in performance by noted Chicago-area professionals. The X-tet's three-concert season offers a variety of pieces, from jazz standards to hip-hop, often in arrangements that are custom-designed for the ensemble by its own members. In rehearsal and performance, the X-tet focuses on developing the improvisational skills of its musicians, as well as on deepening their understanding of the wide-ranging jazz idiom. The group has issued two CDs and frequently performs for University events on campus and elsewhere in the city. In addition to the Jazz X-tet itself, several small jazz combo groups are set up each year to provide training and experience to interested musicians and to perform informally on campus.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17022 Jazz Combo

In addition to the Jazz X-tet, several small jazz combo groups are set up each year to provide training and experience to interested musicians and to perform informally on campus.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17023 Middle East Music Ensemble

The Middle East Music Ensemble explores a variety of classical, neo-classical, and popular musical forms from throughout the Middle East, encompassing compositional and improvisational techniques unique to non-Western musical culture. Members perform on traditional instruments, often in company with noted guest artists, and present multiple concerts both on and off campus. No previous experience in the genre is required, but the ability to read music is necessary. Membership includes students, faculty, and staff of the University, as well as community members interested in the art and music of the Middle East.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17025 South Asian Music Ensemble

The South Asian Music Ensemble explores a variety of classical, vernacular, and popular song repertories from the Indian Subcontinent, with membership open to beginners as well as to more experienced performers with a background in South Asian music. The ensemble will focus on teaching vocal techniques, stylistic features, compositional forms, improvisational practices, and performance conventions specific to India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and South Asian diasporas. In addition to participating in weekly ensemble rehearsals, members will have the option of attending voice coaching sessions and/or engaging the instructor for private lessons. Membership is open to students, faculty, and staff of the University, as well as community members interested in South Asian music.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 17026 Chamber Music Program

The Chamber Music Program creates opportunities for intermediate and advanced wind players, string players, and pianists to learn and perform small ensemble chamber music. Participants in the program study duo, trio, quartet, and quintet repertoire spanning the entire chamber music repertoire, and hone their collaborative skills under the guidance of the chamber music coaches. Weekly Rep Classes offer extra-curricular musical activities as well as studio and masterclass opportunities for ensembles to practice performing and learn from guest artists. Chamber Music Program ensembles receive three coachings per quarter focusing on instrumental technique, interpretation, and collaboration, with the expectation that ensembles maintain regular weekly rehearsal schedules and perform their repertoire at least once during the academic year. Performance opportunities are available at a wide variety of venues on the U of C campus and in the Hyde Park community. Additionally, CMP participants are eligible to take private lessons with the instrumental teacher of their choice, and may audition for the annual Lesson Awards and the bi-annual Concerto Competition.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Performance

MUSI 23300 Introduction to the Social and Cultural Study of Music

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 25020 Opera Across Media

(CMST 24617,ITAL 25020, SIGN 26058, TAPS 26516)

Over the course of the last 120 years, opera and cinema have been sounded and seen together again and again. Where opera is commonly associated with extravagant performance and production, cinema is popularly associated with realism. Yet their encounter not only proves these assumptions wrong but produces some extraordinary third kinds--media hybrids. It also produces some extraordinary love affairs. Thomas Edison wanted a film of his to be “a grand opera,” and Federico Fellini and Woody Allen wanted opera to saturate their films. Thinking about these mutual attractions, “Opera across Media” explores different operatic and cinematic repertories as well as other media forms. Among films to be studied are Pabst’s Threepenny Opera (1931), Visconti’s Senso (1954), Powell and Pressburger’s Tales of Hoffmann (1951), Zeffirelli’s La traviata (1981), DeMille’s Carmen (1915), Losey’s Don Giovanni (1979), Bergman’s The Magic Flute (1975), and Fellini’s E la nave va (1983). No prior background in music performance, theory, or notation is needed. Students may write papers based on their own skills and interests relevant to the course. Required work includes attendance at all screenings and classes; weekly postings on Canvas about readings and viewings; attendances at a Met HD broadcast and a Lyric Opera live opera; a short “think piece” midway through the course; and a final term paper of 8-10 pages.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 26618 Electronic Music: Composing with Sound

(MAAD 24618)

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 27300 Topics in the History of Western Music III

MUSI 27300 treats music since 1800. Topics include the music of Beethoven and his influence on later composers; the rise of public concerts, German opera, programmatic instrumental music, and nationalist trends; the confrontation with modernism; and the impact of technology on the expansion of musical boundaries.

MUSI 14300 or 15300. Open to nonmajors with consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 28008 Sound and Scandal: How Media Make Believe (CMST 28008)

(MAAD 28008, TAPS 20208)

Why has lip syncing caused so many scandals and successes across media, from Milli Vanilli to drag? Primarily focusing on American film, TV, music videos, and animation, this course investigates how sound synchronization creates alternate identities and realities. We may think we know lip sync and voice synthesis when we see and hear them, but close reading unveils deeper issues of technological construction and gendered performances. For example, Singin’ in the Rain dramatizes film’s transition to sound as technicians struggled to match the “right” voice to the “right” body: a beautiful woman with an ugly voice lip syncs to the lovely voice of a woman who Hollywood deems unsuitable to appear onscreen. From The Jazz Singer to today’s alarmingly authentic deepfakes and vocaloids, we will diagnose how vocal appropriation and synthesis conjure states of credibility and belief. We will ask how lip sync authenticates talking animals and faux rockers. Questions of star power and authorship confronting performances of gender and sexuality. No matter the motive, vocal manipulation can never be taken at face value, especially in an age when contortions between sounds and their sources can be passed off as truth.

Amy Skjerseth
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 29500 Undergraduate Honors Seminar

The seminar guides students through the preliminary stages of selecting and refining a topic, and provides an interactive forum for presenting and discussing the early stages of research, conceptualization, and writing. The course culminates in the presentation of a paper that serves as the foundation of the honors thesis. The instructors work closely with honors project supervisors, who may be drawn from the entire music faculty.

Consent of instructor. Open only to third years who are majoring in music and wish to develop a research project and prepare it for submission for departmental honors.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
History

MUSI 24416/30716 Opera as Idea and As Performance (PHIL 21102)

(PHIL 21102)

Is opera an archaic and exotic pageant for fanciers of overweight canaries, or a relevant art form of great subtlety and complexity that has the power to be revelatory? In this course of eight sessions, jointly taught by Professor Martha Nussbaum and Anthony Freud, General Director of Lyric Opera of Chicago, we explore the multi-disciplinary nature of this elusive and much-maligned art form, with its four hundred-year-old European roots, discussing both historic and philosophical contexts and the practicalities of interpretation and production in a very un-European, twenty-first century city. Anchoring each session around a different opera, we will be joined by a variety of guest experts, one each week, including a director, a conductor, a designer and two singers, to enable us to explore different perspectives. The list of operas to be discussed include Monteverdi's The Coronation of Poppaea, Mozart's Don Giovanni, Rossini’s La Cenerentola, Verdi's Don Carlos, Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, Wagner's Die Meistersinger, Strauss's Elektra, and Britten's Billy Budd. (A) (I)

Remark: students do not need to be able to read music, but some antecedent familiarity with opera in performance or through recordings would be extremely helpful. Ph.D. students in the Philosophy Department and the Music Department and all law students (both J. D. and LL.M.) may enroll without permission. All other students will be selected by lottery up to the number feasible given CA arrangements.

Martha Nussbaum, Anthony Freud
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 21800/31800 Conducting

This two-quarter course will provide a conceptual and practical introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted particularly toward graduate students in Music Composition, but it is open to advanced musicians with orchestral performance experience as well. Ideally, students enrolled in the course should have had some experience playing or singing in a performance ensemble, and/or have a basic familiarity with orchestral instruments and traditional repertoire. Proficiency in sightreading, ear-training, and basic keyboard skills are prerequisites for the course, but will not be specifically included in the curriculum.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 33325 Imaging Armenia: Diaspora and the Constitution of Subjectivity (NEHC 30235)

(NEHC 30235)

What does it mean to be “Armenian”? Despite centuries of dispersion and displacement, there has remained, in the Armenian diaspora, a sense of Armenian-ness—a sense, in other words, of being Armenian. This course will serve as an interrogation of and meditation on what that sense of being has looked like across time and space, as seen through the lens of pivotal musical and other artistic works from the post-genocide diaspora. Through in-depth analyses of these works and the discourses surrounding them, this course will trace the emergence, articulation, and negotiation of Armenian diasporic subjectivities and the ways in which those subjectivities have emerged in relation to and in conversation with power structures both internal and external to the Armenian communities under discussion. Diaspora, then, will be approached not as a fixed unit of analysis, but as something that emerges and is sustained through complex relationships and negotiations with sociopolitical forces both within and outside the diasporic community. Through this course, we will see that artistic expression in the Armenian diaspora functions as a site of agency: a site in which the question of what it is to be Armenian is explored in ways that shape, challenge, and upend notions and understandings of diasporic identity.

Sylvia Alajaji
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 23503/33503 Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia (NEHC 30765)

(ANTH 25905, NEHC 30765, REES 25001, REES 35001)

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

Kagan Arik
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 23620/33620 Mapping Black Social Dance: Hip Hop and House in the Community and Onstage (TAPS 26290)

(CRES 26290, CRES 36290, TAPS 36290)

This hybrid studio/seminar course offers an overview of the formal techniques, cultural contexts, and social trends that shape current Black social and vernacular dance practices. Modules will be built around Black social culture by looking at key histories and theories around Black dance, music and other cultural aesthetics from hip hop to house. As part of our exploration, we will cover themes such as: the Great Migration, the range of Black social dance forms from blues, jazz, disco, and dancehall that have influenced the evolution of hip hop and house on global scale; and the spectrum of social spaces from clubs to lounges and public events that have been critical to preserving Black cultural heritage and creating safe spaces for belonging and flourishing. Selected readings and viewings will supplement movement practice to give historical, cultural, and political context.

Meida Mcneal
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 23706/33706 Music of South Asia

(RLST 27700, SALC 20800,SALC 30800)

The course explores some of the music traditions that hail from South Asia—a region defined by the countries of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Afghanistan, Maldives, and their diasporas. The course will study music and some of its inextricably linked forms of dance and theatre through the lens of ethnomusicology, where music is considered in its social and cultural contexts. Students will develop tools to listen, analyze, watch, and participate in South Asian forms of music-making, using case-study based inquiries as guides along the way.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 23721/33721 Races, Castes, And Their Relationships In Latin American Colonial Music (LACS 27720)

(CRES 27730, PORT 27720, SPAN 27720)

The course will undertake a critical survey of repertoires, institutions, and social practices related to musical practices in Spain and Portugal’s American territories between 1558 and ca. 1800. The missions of the Jesuits and other orders, the constitution of the musical chapels of the cathedrals, the “villancico de negros,” and the emergence of local popular music will be some of the topics examined, with a critical assessment of recent views of the role of Colonial music in current musical life.

Leonardo Waisman
2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 34100 Composition Seminar

The composition seminar is a weekly session designed for graduate students in composition. It is an open forum for composers to listen to recent music, including their own, and to discuss issues connected with trends, esthetics, and compositional techniques. The entire composition faculty takes part in these sessions. The composition seminar often hosts well-known visiting composers whose works are performed in the city by various groups or ensembles, as well as performers specializing in new music and contemporary techniques.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 25200/35200 Analysis of 19th Century Music

This course focuses on the tonal language of nineteenth-century European composers, including Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, and Wagner. Students confront analytical problems posed by these and other composers' increasing uses of chromaticism and extended forms through traditional (classical) models of tonal harmony and form, as well as alternative approaches specifically tailored to this repertory. We will also address the ways in which these analytical perspectives might impinge on or influence matters of performance; students with a performance background will be invited to propose a final project that involves both performance and analysis.

MUSI 15300 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 26817/36817 Electronic Music: Introduction to Computer Music

(MAAD 24817)

Electronic Music II is an introduction to computer-based sound art and live electronic music performance. Our primary tool for this course will be SuperCollider, a computer music programming language designed for composition and real-time music applications. Through this language we will explore the foundations of computer music, including digital instrument design, sequencing, live processing, sound diffusion, and various approaches to algorithmic music generation.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Composition

MUSI 37200 History of Music Theory II

This course explores topics in the history of music theory from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries (with excursions into the sixteenth and twenty-first centuries as necessary). We will focus on a range of topics, including: scientific empiricism and music theory, musical rhetoric, the transition from modal to tonal thinking, the partimento tradition, harmonic theory in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, theories of modulation and tonality, theories of form, theories of musical rhythm, hermeneutic and semiotic approaches to musical analysis. Although secondary literature on these topics will be an important part of the assigned readings, our focus will be on primary sources. Not all of these have been translated, and so a reading knowledge of French and German will be useful. (Of course, secondary sources may be in either of these languages as well.) In additional to doing the readings and participating in class discussion, students will make a short presentation on conceptual material relevant to the course and complete two brief analysis assignments. There will be a final exam similar in design to the theory essay exams given during comprehensives.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Theory

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to assist students (typically in their third year) in crafting a dissertation proposal, gaining critical feedback from their peers, and honing compelling research projects. The meeting schedule of the seminar will be flexible: beginning in the fourth week of Autumn term, we will meet about once every two weeks; it may be, however, that we pick up the tempo a bit during Winter term, such that during Spring term we can slow it down a bit to allow students more time to work with their advisors on the formulation of their research projects. Once I know the schedule of the Department workshops I will schedule the meetings of the DPS to avoid conflicts with classes, workshops and other events, and distribute an initial assignment for reading and discussion.

2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to assist students (typically in their third year) in crafting a dissertation proposal, gaining critical feedback from their peers, and honing compelling research projects. The meeting schedule of the seminar will be flexible: beginning in the fourth week of Autumn term, we will meet about once every two weeks; it may be, however, that we pick up the tempo a bit during Winter term, such that during Spring term we can slow it down a bit to allow students more time to work with their advisors on the formulation of their research projects. Once I know the schedule of the Department workshops I will schedule the meetings of the DPS to avoid conflicts with classes, workshops and other events, and distribute an initial assignment for reading and discussion.

2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 41519 Dissertation Pre-Proposal Seminar

The Dissertation Pre-Proposal Seminar (DPPS) is a yearlong course required of all first- and second-year students in the Department of Music. The DPPS provides Ph.D. students in all sub-disciplines—history/theory, ethnomusicology, and composition—with methods and approaches to guide them in the early stages of preparing for the dissertations or, in the case of composers, their minor-field papers. In the course of the year, students will read and examine dissertations and the proposals that led to them. Students develop a fuller understanding of what kinds of research can be helpful in the first and second years, for example, whether short-term visits to archives or ethnographic work might assist them in identifying the empirical materials they will use. At various times during the year, we workshop some of the written work that students prepare as the subjects of their dissertations become clearer. The DPPS leads directly into the Dissertation Proposal Seminar (MUSI 41500), which students take in the third year of their Ph.D. studies. The dissertation seminar sequence in the Music Department concludes with the Dissertation Chapter Seminar (MUSI 41520), taken by students in their fourth and fifth years.

2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 41520 Dissertation Chapter Seminar

During the five three-hour sessions of the Dissertation Chapter Seminar each quarter, Ph.D. students in their fourth and fifth years will have the opportunity to share strategies for writing up their dissertations during the years of most intensive research. We shall work collectively to develop these strategies, investigating the on-the-ground research work that students bring to the DCS from the early stages of research to the completion of chapters in preparation for the dissertation-completion year. Each session will begin with a discussion of research-to-writing strategies, and it will conclude with discussion in the seminar of one or two pre-circulated chapters by students in the DCS. Ph.D. students who are not in residence during their fourth and fifth years, because they are conducting research or no longer in residence in Chicago, will participate remotely. During the Autumn Quarter of 2020/2021, the DCS will be entirely remote. The DCS provides students an opportunity for a sustained and supportive dissertation-writing workshop for Ph.D. students in Music.

2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 41521 Graduate Teaching Forum in Music

2020-2021 Spring

MUSI 42020 The Cabaretesque in Music

We explore a global range of genres that combine music and the intimate stage through the theoretical formulation of the cabaretesque. The performance practices we examine combine music and theater in ways that are historically and culturally diverse, ranging from medieval and early modern European genres such as mystery plays or Purimspiele to commedia dell’arte and operetta to modern musicals and cabaret itself. We also search for similar forms of intimate musical theater in cross-cultural Asian performance, such as Persian siah-bazi, South Indian kathakali, Korean p’ansori, and Japanese chindon-ya. The genres of music on the intimate stage that underlie the history of cinema (e.g., the first synchronized sound films, The Jazz Singer and Der blaue Engel) will be a consistent focus throughout the seminar. To understand the cabaretesque in opera performance we shall look especially closely at the transformation of Berlin’s Komische Oper in the twenty-first-century, applying close readings to several recent productions. Together, we seek to develop the theory of cabaretesque as an approach to understanding complex social and political relations across the fault lines between self and other. Taking Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept of the carnivalesque as a point of departure, we shall read widely in modern writing on the cabaret as a performance practice that turns the world on its head and history inside-out.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Ethnomusicology

MUSI 44220 Music, Philosophy, Praxis

The current indeterminacy of music studies—stemming from its overdue reckoning with the legacies of white supremacy and colonialism—has left scholars with the imperative and the opportunity to rethink the foundations of the field. Amidst this state of things, the seminar will set aside the familiar method of applying philosophical authorities to scholarship on music. Instead, we will investigate music-philosophy as its own praxis: as varied modes of action, of making, and of rethinking what music is, what it does, its pasts, futures, and its mind-bending significance. Through a varied set of course readings, we will discuss salient philosophical issues currently circulating in the field (affect, history, political economy, ineffability, technology, and social difference) and study the work of a few postwar avant-garde musicians who themselves worked with philosophical aspirations.

Michael Gallope
2020-2021 Spring
Category
History