Fall 2013 Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100 Introduction to Western Art Music

MARTHA FELDMAN, CESAR FAVILA

01 Feldman: TR 4:30pm – 5:50pm, GoH 402
02 Favila: TR 1:30pm – 2:50pm, GoH402

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 10200 Introduction to World Music

MEREDITH MCBRIDE, ANDREA JORDAN

01 McBride: TR 10:30am – 11:50am, LC 901
02 Jordan: TR 3:00pm – 4:20pm, LC 901

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 10300 Introduction to Music: Materials and Design

MARTA PTASZYNSKA

TR 3:00pm – 4:20pm, GoH 402

In this variant of the introductory course in music, students explore the language of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and exercises in composition. A study of a wide diversity of musical styles serves as an incentive for student compositions in those styles.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 10400 Introduction to Music Analysis and Criticism

SARAH IKER

MW 1:30pm – 2:50pm, LC 901

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 15100 Harmony and Voice Leading - 1

DREW NOBILE

MWF 10:30am – 11:20am, GoH 402
MWF 11:30am – 12:20pm, GoH 402

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Prerequisite(s): Ability to read music or consent of instructor. Separate keyboard labs will meet in LC 703 at alternative times Tuesday 10:30-11:30, Wednesday 12:30-1:30 and Thursday 9:30-10:30 for both 01 and 02 sections.

MUSI 21811 Tuning Theory

EASLEY BLACKWOOD

TR 3:00pm – 4:20pm, Goh 205

Prerequisite(s): Prior music course and ability to read music.

MUSI 23413 Music of Latin America

DANIEL GOUGH

MW 3:00pm – 4:20pm, LC 801

 

MUSI 23514 Chanson Francaise

KALEY MASON

TR 10:30am – 11:50am, GoH 205

Chanson Française examines the artistry of French popular song from 1880 to the present. The course introduces an extensive repertoire of singular chanson recordings, develops analytical skills for studying songs as integrated musical, literary, visual, and expressive bodily practices, interprets individual exceptionality as embedded in wider social relations of musical production, and explores literature on chanson ranging from cultural history and film criticism to performance studies, sociology, and ethnomusicology. A beginner level of French is recommended for participants enrolled in MUSI 23514, whereas an intermediate level is required for FREN 23514 in order to engage critically with scholarship in French. Knowledge of Western music theory is helpful, but not essential.

The survey begins in the café­-concerts, cabarets, and music-­halls of belle-­époque Paris, where highbrow and working-­class sensibilities mingled in a modern bricolage of art and entertainment. After tracing the figure of the realist singer on stage, on recordings, in film, and through the extraordinary career of Edith Piaf, we turn to the postwar golden era and the canonized trio of Brassens, Brel, and Ferré. In the second half we explore how chanson artists responded to the turbulent 60s, including the growing influence of television and Anglo-­American popular music, the politics of mass consumption, the end of colonial rule, and the convergence of Leftist social movements. In the final weeks of the course we focus on the contributions of a new generation of singer-­‐songwriters who braided lyrical sophistication, French poetics, and vocal intimacy with new popular music aesthetics. We also consider how postcolonial encounters transformed the chanson, and we look at how other francophone songwriting traditions like the chanson québécoise evolved in dialogue with European scenes. The course concludes with the revival of the realist song tradition, as well as recent trends in what music critics refer to as La nouvelle scène française, a return to the aesthetic values of chansons d’auteur, songs authored, composed, and performed by artists whose originality and literary cachet elevate their status vis-­à-­‐vis mainstream popular music. We close with a reflection on the contemporary international appeal of popular French song at annual events like the Festival d’été de Québec and Les Francofolies in Montreal, Belgium, and New York.

MUSI 25600 Jazz Theory and Improvisation

MWATA BOWDEN

TR 1:30pm – 2:50pm, GoH 205

This course focuses on the knowledge necessary to improvise over the chord changes of standard jazz tunes. We cover basic terminology and chord symbols, scale-to-chord relationships, connection devices, and turn-around patterns. For the more experienced improviser, we explore alternate chord changes, tritone substitutions, and ornamentations. Using techniques gained in class, students write their own solos on a jazz tune and transcribe solos from recordings.

Prerequisite(s): Prior music course and ability to read music or consent of instructor.

MUSI 25801 The Analysis of Song

LAWRENCE ZBIKOWSKI

MW 3:00pm – 4:20pm, GoH 205

This course focuses on the art song of the nineteenth century, with special attention to the relationship between tonal structure and song text. Both individual songs and song cycles are considered, with the main emphasis on works by Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms. Student projects include comparative analyses of settings of the same text by different composers, analyses of a song and its later arrangement as an instrumental work, or the analysis and performance of a song.

Pre-requisite(s): Prior music course and ability to read music.

MUSI 26809 Studies in Computer Music

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30am – 1:20pm, Goh 210

The Arduino is an open architecture, small form factor and extremely flexible microcontroller. Over the last few years it has become an indispensible tool for multimedia, visual and sound artists for creating interactive installations. It isn’t an exaggeration to say that the Arduino is the de facto standard for the pursuits of and related to interactive kinetic, visual and sound art, robotics and small form factor digital media. In this seminar/workshop, students will explore the Arduino, hardware and software, the application of various environmental sensors like sonar, proximity, light, sound and mechanical vibration and communication with a host computer. In addition to exploring the programming possibilities of the Arduino, students will learn the basic principles of electrical theory as it applies to the myriad of sensors and transducers, which deliver/receive interactive data to and from the Arduino and host computer. One important goal of the course is the completion of interactive works of sound, visual, kinetic or multimedia art at the course conclusion.

The class is open to graduate and select undergraduate students with the consent of the instructor. Students in Music Composition, Visual Arts and Computer Science will find this a unique opportunity to explore the techniques and technology of interactive art.

Students will be required to acquire their own Arduino microcontroller and as the course progresses, purchase the sensors, electronic hardware and software necessary to produce their final interact work of visual or sound art. The facilities of the Computer Music Studio will be available to students registered for the course.

Pre-requisite(s): Intro to Computer Music 1 and 2 or Consent of Instructor.

MUSI 27813 Music in the German Imagination

COLIN BENERT

TR 3:00pm – 4:20pm, Cobb 218

This course examines music as a theme in German literature from the 19th to the early 20th centuries. It explores the various ways that authors and critics imagined music as a “language beyond language” — an art-form that contained “deeper” or “higher” meanings than those communicated through verbal representation. We pursue this topic especially in the context of German social and political history, and investigate how perspectives on music’s meaning shifted in conjunction with the seismic changes that took place in German society between the French Revolution and WWI. Readings include works of fiction by E. T. A. Hoffmann, Heinrich von Kleist, Franz Grillparzer, Eduard Mörike, Richard Wagner, Thomas Mann, and Franz Kafka, as well as brief excerpts of critical works by A. B. Marx, Richard Wagner, and Theodor Adorno.
Readings, discussions, and written assignments in German.

Pre-requisite(s): 3rd year German or consent of instructor. No auditors. Taught in German.

MUSI 27914 Ligeti's Third Way

ANTHONY CHEUNG

TR 10:30am – 11:50am, GoH 402

This course will attempt to locate and analyze various aspects of influence and pedagogy surrounding one of the most illustrious and admired composers of the late 20th Century. We will examine the later works of György Ligeti - written in the 1980s and 90s, from the Horn Trio onwards - and the direction the composer himself described in 1981 as a "third way": neither avant-garde nor reactionary, modernist nor postmodern, tonal nor atonal. We will discuss multiple influences such as microtonal harmony (just intonation and spectralist thinking), African polyrhythms, mechanical music (especially the player piano music of Conlon Nancarrow), and jazz (Bill Evans, Thelonious Monk, et al.). This polystylism, at once distinctive and recognizable by its own consistent vocabulary, was as much a reflection of the openness of its creator as it was a skillful technique of reinvention, reflecting a desire to be viewed in the company of outsider contemporaries, whom Ligeti had always admired more than the avant-garde elite with which he was usually associated. Ligeti's late works, most of which have become staples of the contemporary music repertoire, will be viewed through the parallel developments and enthusiasms of his students of the same period in Hamburg. We will look at the complex layers of inheritance and disavowal in the mentor-student relationships of these composers, who include such imaginative and diverse figures as Hans Abrahamsen, Denys Bouliane, Unsuk Chin, Benedict Mason, Roberto Sierra, and Manfred Stahnke.

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

PHILIP KLOECKNER

F 1:30pm – 2:20pm, JRL 264

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

Pre-requisite(s): MUSI 15300. Open only to students who are majoring in music. Note(s): 100 units credit are granted only after successful completion of the year's work.

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GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 31506 Modal Analysis

MICHAEL O'TOOLE

M 9:00am – 11:50am, JRL 264

 

MUSI 31801 The Analysis of Song

LAWRENCE ZBIKOWSKI

MW 3:00pm – 4:20pm, GoH 205

This course serves two functions: as a preparatory review for the topics covered in Music 31100 (Tonal Analysis), which will be offered in Winter term; and as an introduction to the nineteenth century Lied. These functions are associated with the two main goals of the course: to develop further students’ skills for analyzing and writing about tonal music; and to explore how words and music relate to one another in German vocal music of the early-­‐ to mid-­‐nineteenth century. The composers whose songs on which we shall focus will be Franz Schubert and Robert Schumann, although we shall certainly look at the works of other composers as occasion arises. Work for the course will include weekly assignments and four short analysis papers, the latter distributed fairly evenly across the term.

MUSI 32500 Proseminar in Music, 1600-1700

ROBERT KENDRICK

T 9:00am – 11:50am, JRL 264

Music at this point of early modern Europe raises some important cultural problems, ranging from the scientific revolution, to issues of gender, international connections, and performance practice. This proseminar attempts to address them by introducing students to primary sources, musical repertory, and important secondary literature. We will take special looks at music in Mantua, Venice, Dresden, and Paris. There will be individual projects on sources, a short writing assignment, reports on readings in class, and a take-home final.

MUSI 32600 Proseminar in Music, 1700-1800

MARTHA FELDMAN

W 1:30pm – 4:20pm, JRL 264

This course is designed to acquaint you with salient scholarly issues on trends and repertories in eighteenth-century European music. The impossibility of being inclusive is more pronounced in this proseminar than perhaps any other, as no period in the history of music is marked as many musical works and sources. One of our sustaining questions will be why. For coping with this profusion our principal organizing nodes will be keywords in the encyclopedia of eighteenth-century knowledge: science, reason, galant, taste, nature, genius, imagination, rhetoric, the pathetic, the aesthetic, the body, sense, sensibility, the sublime, and the encyclopedia itself.

Each week a number of readings and works will mobilize class discussions. Readings are intended, in conjunction with score study, to help you gain a sense of how different historical approaches have shaped views of eighteenth-century repertory, and vice versa. My hope is that by the end of the course, you will have a more secure footing in the music of the period and better fluency in themes that have been occupying scholars’ attentions in recent times, and thus shaping the eighteenth century as a field of musical study. Instead of trying to provide comprehensive coverage of either repertory or historical developments, this proseminar will aid in developing critical perspectives on eighteenth-century musical studies, informed by substantive knowledge of selected primary and secondary sources.

MUSI 33514 Chanson Française

KALEY MASON

TR 10:30am – 11:50am, GoH 205

Chanson Française examines the artistry of French popular song from 1880 to the present. The course introduces an extensive repertoire of singular chanson recordings, develops analytical skills for studying songs as integrated musical, literary, visual, and expressive bodily practices, interprets individual exceptionality as embedded in wider social relations of musical production, and explores literature on chanson ranging from cultural history and film criticism to performance studies, sociology, and ethnomusicology. A beginner level of French is recommended for participants enrolled in MUSI 23514, whereas an intermediate level is required for FREN 23514 in order to engage critically with scholarship in French. Knowledge of Western music theory is helpful, but not essential.

The survey begins in the café­-concerts, cabarets, and music-­halls of belle-­époque Paris, where highbrow and working-­class sensibilities mingled in a modern bricolage of art and entertainment. After tracing the figure of the realist singer on stage, on recordings, in film, and through the extraordinary career of Edith Piaf, we turn to the postwar golden era and the canonized trio of Brassens, Brel, and Ferré. In the second half we explore how chanson artists responded to the turbulent 60s, including the growing influence of television and Anglo-­American popular music, the politics of mass consumption, the end of colonial rule, and the convergence of Leftist social movements. In the final weeks of the course we focus on the contributions of a new generation of singer-­‐songwriters who braided lyrical sophistication, French poetics, and vocal intimacy with new popular music aesthetics. We also consider how postcolonial encounters transformed the chanson, and we look at how other francophone songwriting traditions like the chanson québécoise evolved in dialogue with European scenes. The course concludes with the revival of the realist song tradition, as well as recent trends in what music critics refer to as La nouvelle scène française, a return to the aesthetic values of chansons d’auteur, songs authored, composed, and performed by artists whose originality and literary cachet elevate their status vis-­à-­‐vis mainstream popular music. We close with a reflection on the contemporary international appeal of popular French song at annual events like the Festival d’été de Québec and Les Francofolies in Montreal, Belgium, and New York.

MUSI 33800 Ethnographic Methods

KALEY MASON

M 1:30pm – 4:20pm, JRL 264

This proseminar is designed to equip graduate students with methodological and epistemological tools for doing ethnographic fieldwork in expressive cultural contexts. Topics are divided into three stages, beginning with a prefield introduction to research design, politics, and ethics, followed by an infield focus on skill sets and media for participating in, observing, and documenting art worlds in everyday life, and ending with a postfield emphasis on relationships, rights, responsibilities, and representational strategies. In class we discuss readings from anthropology, ethnomusicology, sociology, and folklore along with individual work in progress. In addition to clarifying concepts and methods related to ethnographic inquiry, we also reflect on the kind of knowledge we craft, the people whom this knowledge concerns and serves, the protocols for its use, and how our individual subject locations—our differences of gender, sexual orientation, class, race, ethnicity, faith, generation, and nationality—shape the interpretive process.

MUSI 34100 Seminar: Composition

MARTA PTASZYNSKA

M 4:30pm – 5:50pm, Goh 205

 

MUSI 35811 Tuning Theory

EASLEY BLACKWOOD

TR 3:00pm – 4:20pm, Goh 205

Prerequisite(s): Prior music course and ability to read music.

MUSI 36809 Studies in Computer Music

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30am – 1:20pm, Goh 210

The Arduino is an open architecture, small form factor and extremely flexible microcontroller. Over the last few years it has become an indispensible tool for multimedia, visual and sound artists for creating interactive installations. It isn’t an exaggeration to say that the Arduino is the de facto standard for the pursuits of and related to interactive kinetic, visual and sound art, robotics and small form factor digital media. In this seminar/workshop, students will explore the Arduino, hardware and software, the application of various environmental sensors like sonar, proximity, light, sound and mechanical vibration and communication with a host computer. In addition to exploring the programming possibilities of the Arduino, students will learn the basic principles of electrical theory as it applies to the myriad of sensors and transducers, which deliver/receive interactive data to and from the Arduino and host computer. One important goal of the course is the completion of interactive works of sound, visual, kinetic or multimedia art at the course conclusion.

The class is open to graduate and select undergraduate students with the consent of the instructor. Students in Music Composition, Visual Arts and Computer Science will find this a unique opportunity to explore the techniques and technology of interactive art.

Students will be required to acquire their own Arduino microcontroller and as the course progresses, purchase the sensors, electronic hardware and software necessary to produce their final interact work of visual or sound art. The facilities of the Computer Music Studio will be available to students registered for the course.

Pre-requisite(s): Intro to Computer Music 1 and 2 or Consent of Instructor.

MUSI 37914 Ligeti's Third Way

ANTHONY CHEUNG

TR 10:30am – 11:50am, GoH 402

This course will attempt to locate and analyze various aspects of influence and pedagogy surrounding one of the most illustrious and admired composers of the late 20th Century. We will examine the later works of György Ligeti - written in the 1980s and 90s, from the Horn Trio onwards - and the direction the composer himself described in 1981 as a "third way": neither avant-garde nor reactionary, modernist nor postmodern, tonal nor atonal. We will discuss multiple influences such as microtonal harmony (just intonation and spectralist thinking), African polyrhythms, mechanical music (especially the player piano music of Conlon Nancarrow), and jazz (Bill Evans, Thelonious Monk, et al.). This polystylism, at once distinctive and recognizable by its own consistent vocabulary, was as much a reflection of the openness of its creator as it was a skillful technique of reinvention, reflecting a desire to be viewed in the company of outsider contemporaries, whom Ligeti had always admired more than the avant-garde elite with which he was usually associated. Ligeti's late works, most of which have become staples of the contemporary music repertoire, will be viewed through the parallel developments and enthusiasms of his students of the same period in Hamburg. We will look at the complex layers of inheritance and disavowal in the mentor-student relationships of these composers, who include such imaginative and diverse figures as Hans Abrahamsen, Denys Bouliane, Unsuk Chin, Benedict Mason, Roberto Sierra, and Manfred Stahnke.

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

BERTHOLD HOECKNER

W 12:00pm – 2:00pm, JRL 264

The goal of this seminar is to help doctoral students who have taken their Comprehensive Exams produce a dissertation proposal over the course of this academic year. The seminar meets every other week in Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. We will proceed from selecting and formulating a topic to planning and writing a proposal. Participants will regularly present abstracts, drafts, and versions of their proposal. Peer review will be an important part of the process.

MUSI 43014 Learning Music 1400-1800

THOMAS CHRISTENSEN

W 9:00am – 11:50am, JRL 264

In this seminar, we will consider a big question: How was music taught and learnt over four centuries of Western history? Obviously, no simple answer can be given to such a question. But by considering a number of differing case studies involving various configurations of subject matter, institutional patronage, media, and methods, we will hope to gain a more textured picture of changing (and overlapping) approaches to music pedagogy over the course of early modernity. To manage this ambitious agenda, I have selected ten differing “moments” of musical learning. We will read one or two primary texts (mostly in English or English translation) along with selected secondary literature. A key part of the seminar will be the weekly “teaching labs” in which a member of the seminar will teach (or lecture, as the case may be) a mock class (or studio) inspired by a specific historical model. This will then constitute the basis of a final paper due at the end of the seminar.

MUSI 44413 Graduate Research Seminar "Film, Theory, Music"

BERTHOLD HOECKNER

F 9:00am – 11:50am, JRL 264

Screenings M 7:00pm, JRL 264

The aim of this graduate research seminar is to explore relations between film, critical theory, and music. Our main point of reference will be the scholarship my late colleague Miriam Hansen, notably her second and last book Cinema and Experience: Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor W. Adorno (University of California Press, 2012). Over the course of the quarter we will read this book along with select primary texts by these and more recent authors alongside selected films. Participants will be asked to prepare readings for weekly seminar sessions, create the cue sheet for one film, and present a research paper at a miniconference in Week 11.

MUSI 44813 Post-Punk

TRAVIS JACKSON

T 2:00pm – 4:50pm, JRL 264

This course is a research-based seminar focused on the post-punk era in rock history, a period dating roughly from 1977 to 1984. It has two interlocking emphases: the first concerns the music - e.g., its changing sounds, production practices and media - and the second the visual representations - record sleeves, posters, advertisements, and ultimately moving images-that characterize the era. Since, as its name indicates, post-punk followed immediately upon the brief punk moment of 1976-77, some commentators have argued that, especially in the UK, both the music and design continued a powerful critique of the political, social and cultural currents of the time. Our readings will provide a context for questioning those claims and for moving toward a balanced appraisal of the era’s position in histories musical, visual and otherwise. Among the topic-specific issues we will pursue throughout the quarter are aspects of continuity and change with previous eras; how post-punk articulates with musical/visual styles contemporaneous to it; and what effects, if any, the output of recordists and designers might have had on subsequent sound and design work. On a more general level, our concern will be to develop an understanding of and replicable methods for studying how sounds and images, when combined or juxtaposed, relate to one another and a range of sociocultural issues, in the process affording neither priority and assuming no one-to-one correspondences.

MUSI 45014 Choreomusicality

DANIEL CALLAHAN

R 1:30pm – 4:20pm, JRL 264