Winter 2019 Courses

For up-to-date room assignments, visit classes.uchicago.edu

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100: Introduction to Western Art Music

Patrick Fitzgibbon: M/W 3:00 - 4:20, GOH 402
Lindsay Wright:  T/R 2:00 - 3:20, GOH 402

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside. 

MUSI 10200: Introduction to World Music

Anna Schultz: T/R 9:30 - 10:50, GOH 402
Michael Allemana: M/W 1:30 - 2:50, GOH 402
Joseph Maurer: T/R 12:30 - 1:50, GOH 402

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored. 

MUSI 10300: Introduction to Music: Materials and Design

Sam Pluta: M/W 3:00 - 4:20, LC 901
John Hughes: T/R 3:30 - 4:50, LC 703

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

MUSI 10400: Introduction to Music: Analysis and Criticism

Rebecca Flore: T/R 11:00 - 12:20, GOH 402
Zachary Loeffler: T/R 11:00 - 12:20, LC 901
Alican Çamci: T/R 9:30 - 10:50, GOH 205

This course aims to develop students’ analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

MUSI 12100: Music in Western Civilization I

Robert Kendrick: MWF 10:30-11:20, Cobb 307

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Prerequisites: Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 15200: Harmony and Voice Leading II

Olga Sanchez Kisielewska: MWF 10:30-11:20
Olga Sanchez Kisielewska: MWF 11:30-12:20

Separate keyboard labs will meet: MW 1:30-2:20 OR TR 10:00-10:50 OR TR 11:00-11:50.

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

MUSI 20719: Music and Mind

Lawrence Zbikowski: R 9:30-12:20, GOH 205

This course explores research on music in the mind and brain sciences as it has developed over the past three decades. During this time, we have come to an increasingly refined understanding of the ways the brain processes sound. It remains the case, however, that not all sound is music, and in this course we will investigate how musical sound is organized to make it musical, and how this organization reflects the capacities of the human mind. Readings will engage both scientific and humanistic literature, and class meetings will focus on discussions of those readings. Students will write three short papers. The first two of these will concentrate on challenges raised in the readings; the third will be on a topic of the student’s choosing.

MUSI 23300: Introduction to the Social and Cultural Study of Music

Philip Bohlman: T/R 11:00 - 12:20, GOH 205

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

MUSI 24000: Composition Lessons

Arranged with composition faculty.

MUSI 24417: Making and Meaning in the American Musical

Thomas Christensen: T/R 9:30 - 10:50, LC 901

The history of the American musical in the 20th century is paradoxical. While the genre is often denigrated as staging lyrical utopias of romance and adventure allowing audiences to escape depressing quotidian realities, many musicals did seek to engage some of the most pressing social issues of their day. In this course, we will look—and listen—closely to four differing musicals from the 20th century, studying their creative origins, while also analyzing their complex social meanings revealed through the story, music, lyrics, staging, and dance.

MUSI 25100/30809: 18th-century Music Analysis

Jennifer Iverson: M/W 1:30 - 2:50, GOH 205

This course focuses on the analysis of music by composers associated with the Viennese classical period, including Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Topics include classical phrase structure, standard tonal forms such as sonata-allegro, and basic chromatic harmony. Participants present model compositions and write analytical papers.

MUSI 26618/36618: Electronic Music I: Composing With Sound

David Mettens: T/R 2:00 - 3:20, GOH 205

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.


MUSIC ENSEMBLES


GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 32805: Proseminar 1900-Present

Seth Brodsky: M 9:30 - 12:20 JRL 264 

A seminar in twentieth- and twenty-first-century western music is a terribly hoary "topic", if such a tame word can really access the taxonomic catastrophe of "what happened in/with/to western music after 1900". This is somewhat alleviated by the "pro" in proseminar: as with the other proseminars, ours is not principally a survey, but rather an engagement "with salient scholarly issues on trends and repertories" of its chosen time- period. Put another way: we'll be focusing more on how people within the last long decade think and write about music that emerged since 1900, and less on "what actually happened”* (the "content", history, or music-theoretical aspects of various repertories, styles, movements, figures). In the process, we’ll proceed conceptually and thematically rather than chronologically or via various “traditions”; in addition, we’ll explore three mutually irreducible but often interacting fields of musical production: 1) classical or “composerly”musics, 2) popular musics, and 3) jazz and improvisational idioms. We’ll maintain a dual-focus how these fields listen to themselves (traditions, legacies, evolutions and revolutions) but also to each other (fusions, hybrids, crossovers) and to their other (in many cases non-Western) others.

MUSI 33517: Music of the Caribbean

Jessica Baker:  W 9:30 - 12:20, LC  901

This course covers the sonic and structural characteristics, as well as the social, political, environmental, and historical contexts of Caribbean popular and folk music. These initial inquiries will give way to the investigation of a range of theoretical concepts that are particularly important to an understanding of the Caribbean and its people. Specifically, we will think through the ways in which creolization, hybridity, colonialism and postcolonialism, nationalism, and migration inform and shape music performance and consumption in the region and throughout its diaspora. In this course, participants will listen to many different styles and repertoires of music, ranging from calypso to kumina, from reggaeton to bachata, and from dancehall to zouk. We will also examine how the Caribbean and its music are imagined and engaged with globally by focusing attention on how and why music from that region has traveled, and been adopted and adapted by numerous ethnic and religious “others.”

MUSI 34000: Composition Lessons

Arranged with Composition Faculty.

MUSI 34100: Composition Seminar

Anthony Cheung: T 5:00 - 5:50, LC 901

MUSI 26618/36618: Electronic Music I: Composing With Sound

David Mettens: T/R 2:00 - 3:20, GOH 205

Electronic Music I presents an open environment for creativity and expression through composition in the electronic music studio. The course provides students with a background in the fundamentals of sound and acoustics, covers the theory and practice of digital signal processing for audio, and introduces the recording studio as a powerful compositional tool. The course culminates in a concert of original student works presented in multi-channel surround sound. Enrollment gives students access to the Electronic Music Studio in the Department of Music. No prior knowledge of electronic music is necessary.

MUSI 37200: History of Music Theory II

Lawrence Zbikowski: R 9:30 - 12:20 JRL 264

In this pro-seminar, we will be studying and analyzing a number of key theoretical and analytic concepts from the mid- sixteenth century until the early twentieth century.   Emphasis will be placed upon the close reading of primary sources (mostly in English translations), though selected secondary readings will be assigned as well.  Among the topics we will look at concern the meaning and application of modes in the 17th century; rhetoric and melody;  Rameau’s harmonic theory and the scientific revolution;  partimenti and thorough bass practice;   Formenlehre in the 19th century;   dualism and function theory in the circle around Riemann;  and finally energetics in early 20th century theory and analysis.

There will be several short essays or exercises assigned during the quarter (responses to readings, critiques of secondary readings, applied analyses, etc.)  In addition there will a take-home final examination.

MUSI 41500: Dissertation Proposal Seminar

Philip Bohlman: M 1:30 - 4:20, JRL 264

MUSI 42619: Gender Theory in Musicology

Anna Schultz: F 9:30 - 12:20, JRL 264

This graduate seminar introduces students to the history, development, and current status of gender and feminist theory in ethnomusicology. Issues we will discuss include: gender in ethnomusicological fieldwork; early feminist critiques in ethnomusicology; gender, body, and performance; sexuality in music; musical masculinities; music technology and gender; gender and labor; and intersectional feminist ethnomusicology. Ethnomusicology is deeply interdisciplinary, so our readings will include relevant texts from anthropology, performance studies, and historical musicology.

MUSI 45019: Opera and Film in China and Europe

Martha Feldman and Judith Zeitlin: W 1:30 - 4:20 JRL 264

This seminar will explore the mutual attraction of cinema and opera across the two vast operatic cultures of Europe and China in order to interrogate the many cross-cultural issues that their media encounters produce and accentuate. Such issues include changing relations to myth, ritual, history, and politics; cross-dressing and gender-bending; closed forms or open; stock characters wand plots or narrative fluidity. We will ask why in both China and Europe, opera repeatedly became the conflicted site of nationalist and modernizing aspirations, reiterations of tradition, and attempts at avant-gardism. When the presumed realism of film meets the extravagant hyperperformativity of opera, the encounter produces some extraordinary third kinds-media hybrids. Film repeatedly wrestled with the inherent histrionics of opera through the use of such devices as close-ups, camera angles, shot reverse shot, displacement of sound from sight, acousmatic sound, and trick photography. Such devices were generally meant to suture the supposed improbabilities of the operatic art form, incongruities often based on extravagant and transcendent relationships to realism. Such cinematic renderings of opera are highly revealing of fundamental faultlines in the genres themselves and revealing of the cultures that produced them. This seminar will explore the mutual attraction of cinema and opera across the two vast operatic cultures of Europe and China in order to interrogate the many cross-cultural issues that their media encounters produce and accentuate. Such issues include changing relations to myth, ritual, history, and politics; cross-dressing and gender-bending; closed forms or open; stock characters wand plots or narrative fluidity. We will ask why in both China and Europe, opera repeatedly became the conflicted site of nationalist and modernizing aspirations, reiterations of tradition, and attempts at avant-gardism. When the presumed realism of film meets the extravagant hyperperformativity of opera, the encounter produces some extraordinary third kinds-media hybrids. Film repeatedly wrestled with the inherent histrionics of opera through the use of such devices as close-ups, camera angles, shot reverse shot, displacement of sound from sight, acousmatic sound, and trick photography. Such devices were generally meant to suture the supposed improbabilities of the operatic art form, incongruities often based on extravagant and transcendent relationships to realism. Such cinematic renderings of opera are highly revealing of fundamental faultlines in the genres themselves and revealing of the cultures that produced them.