Winter 2016 Courses

For up-to-date room assignments, visit classes.uchicago.edu


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100: Introduction to Western Art Music

SETH BRODSKY, JESS PERITZ

1. Brodsky: M,W 1:30-2:50 pm
2. Peritz: T,R 12:00-1:20 pm

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

MUSI 1​0200: Introduction to World Music

TRAVIS JACKSON, PHILIP BOHLMAN

1. Jackson: T,R 9:00-10:20 am
2. Bohlman: T,R 10:30-11:50 am

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

MUSI 103​00: Introduction to Materials and Design

TOMAS GUEGLIO SACCONE, ALICAN CAMCI

1. Saccone: T,R 1:30-2:50 pm
2. Camci: T,R 3:00-4:20 pm

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

MUSI 10400: ​Introduction to Music Analysis and Criticism

BERTHOLD HOECKNER, TIMOTHY PAGE

1. Hoeckner: T,R 9:00-10:20 am
2. Page: T,R 12:00 - 1:20 pm

This course aims to develop students’ analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

MUSI 12100: Music in Western Civilization I: through 1750

ANNE ROBERTSON

M,W,F 10:30-11:20 am​

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

MUSI 15200: Harmony and Voice Leading 2

NANCY MURPHY

1. Murphy: M,W,F 10:30-11:20 am
2. Murphy: M,W,F 11:30-12:20 pm

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and non-diatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Separate keyboard labs will meet: MW 1:30-2:20, or TR 9:30-10:20, or TR 10:30-11:20.

MUSI 23416: Music and Globalization in Modern Latin America

PABLO PALOMINO

T,R 10:30-11:50 am

This course introduces students to the history of the globalization of Latin America from the perspective of the history of the region’s musical practices in the 20th century. Lectures, group work, readings, and an individual paper will deal with the circulation of music across national and cultural boundaries. The course focuses on both famous and obliterated histories of folk, classical, and urban musical traditions, diasporic music styles, entertainment corporations, music markets and technology, state policies, music pedagogy, cinema, Latin American musicology, musical nationalism, and musical diplomacy. Each week we will listen and discuss musical pieces in class to enable an active dialogue between history and sound. Musical training is welcome but not necessary to take this class. The emphasis is on the late 19th and the 20th centuries, but issues of colonial, early post-colonial, and 21st century music will also be considered.

“Musical practices” are approached here from the intersection of history, sociology and ethnomusicology, and as a wide range of dimensions related to material, economic, labor, public policy, aesthetic discourses, identity, and political forms. The course provides thus a historical framework to music students, and a consideration of music and musical sources to students in history and the social sciences.

The grade will consider class participation and a paper (15 pages) applying some of the readings and concepts discussed in class on a Latin American music-related object selected by the student - a recording, a score, a book, a film, or a painting.

MUSI 23516: Judeo-Islamic Musical Intersections

EDWIN SEROUSSI

M,W 1:30-2:30 pm

Following the inception of Islam in the early 7th century, most Jews at that time found themselves living under this new geo-political-religious power. This close multidenominational encounter continued without interruption, albeit in different numbers, until the 20th century.  The interaction between Islam and Judaism at all levels of culture was intense.  Music was one of major fields in which such a Judeo-Islamic exchange occurred.  This course will survey different areas of Judeo-Islamic musical contacts in vast geographical areas from the Maghreb to Central Asia, in diverse genres and contexts of musical performance, such as the synagogue, religious festivals, life cycle events, folk song, courtly traditions and modern popular music. Basic issues to be addressed are the study of music in ritual contexts, music as a marker of identities, music as a medium for religious experiences, music memory and conflict, music and colonialism, and music as a constituent of modernity outside Europe. Modern and postmodern constructions of the remote past, e.g. the “convinvecia” of Jews, Muslims and Christians in medieval Spain, will be discussed a-propos music.

Another topic is the fate of Jewish musical traditions from the Lands of Islam after their massive dislocations in the 20th century in genres such as musika mizrahit in Israel and the chanson franco-arabe in France.  The pervasive notion (especially in the field of “World Music”) that through music contemporary Jews and Muslims can (re-)enact reconciliation will be discussed critically.  Oral appreciation, analysis and interpretation of recorded and visual musical materials are the basis for this course that does not require proficiency in reading musical notation. A selection of reading assignment on the subject will supplement listening activities.

MUSI 23610: Music of the Caribbean

MELVIN BUTLER

T, R 9:00-10:20 am

This course covers the history, sonic character, and sociocultural contexts of important genres of Caribbean music. We will pay particular attention to the intersections of musical practice, social identity, and various forms of spiritual and political power. A recurring theme will be the role of music in sustaining transnational linkages between the Caribbean and the United States. Highlighting the cultivation of long-distance national identities and the migration of sound and practice to and from the Caribbean region, we will also work to understand contributions from African and European sources as they have interacted in terms of acculturation, creolization, syncretism, hybridity, ritualization, and resistance. Discussions, lectures, reading material, and listening
assignments will mostly concern the Anglophone, Francophone, and Creolophone Caribbean, but final projects may be devoted to other locales, according to students’ research interests.

MUSI 24000: Composition Lessons

Arranged with composition faculty

This course consists of individual weekly composition lessons.

MUSI 25300: Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music

STEVEN RINGS

T,R 10:30-11:50 am

This course offers an intensive study in analytical and theoretical approaches to 20th-century art music. Students will develop fluency in the analytical and theoretical tools that typically fall under the rubric of “set theory”—the lingua franca of post-tonal analysis—and explore the ways in which that apparatus can be applied profitably in the analysis of diverse 20th-century repertories. We will seek to foster a critical awareness of both the virtues and limits of set-theoretic approaches, employing alternative means of discussing the music at hand when that is warranted. In addition to readings—which will be drawn both from the scholarly literature and from texts on post-tonal theory—coursework will consist of weekly assignments (including problem sets), brief analytical presentations, a midterm, a final, and a final paper.

MUSI 26100: Introduction to Composition

AUGUSTA READ THOMAS

M,W 4:30-5:50 pm

Designed for beginning composers to practice and hone the nuances of their musical craft, this course introduces some of the fundamentals of music composition through a series of exercises as well as several larger creative projects. Professional musicians will perform students’ exercises and compositions.

This is primarily a creative, composing course. Through a combination of composition assignments, listening, discussion, analysis, and reading, we will explore and practice the fundamental aspects of music composition. Repertoire study, harmony, counterpoint, rhythm, orchestration, timbre, form, transformation, and several other pertinent essentials are included in the curriculum. This laboratory-style, practical course is interactive and discussion-based.

MUSI 28500: Musicianship Skills

PHILIP KL​OECKNER

F 1:30-2:20​ pm

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

MUSI 29700:​ Music Independant Study

Arranged with faculty

This course is intended for students who wish to pursue specialized readings in music or to do advanced work in composition.

MUSIC ENSEMBLES


GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 31100: Tonal Analysis

LAWRENCE ZBIKOWSKI

M,W 1:30-2:50 pm

This course introduces fundamental tools of tonal analysis, applied to music of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Of particular importance will be Heinrich Schenker’s influential theory of linear analysis, which we will explore primarily through application. We will also discuss—and practice—the art of good analytic writing and rhetoric through the reading (and emulation) of model analyses.

Note: Music 31100 is conceived as a preparation and foundation for Music 31200, which follows in Spring term.

MUSI 31516: Ethnomusicological Analysis

PHILIP BOHLMAN

R 1:30-4:20 pm

In this proseminar in analysis we examine the concepts and structures of mode that stretch from South Asia across the Middle East to the Mediterranean. We concentrate our comparative study on Arabic maqām, Turkish makam, Persian radif, North Indian/Hindustani rāg, and South Indian/Karnatak rāga. Historically, processes and patterns of exchange between classical, popular, and folk musics in these regions have shaped ideas of melody and form, vocal practice and instrumental accompaniment, improvisation and composition, bearing witness to similarities and cross-influences no less than to distinctive local and regional music cultures. To know and understand the music cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, as well as Muslim regions of Central and East Asia, it is indispensable also to understand the practices of improvisation and composition we analyze in this proseminar.

Our own approach to mode will begin with study of historical approaches to music theory, Arabic, Persian, and Turkish treatises in the Middle East, and the great Sanskrit works on music and the arts, such as the Nāṭyaśāstra. Students will also acquire critical approaches to analysis through a series of transcription and analysis exercises. All students participating in the proseminar, whether ethnomusicologists, for whom the course is a requirement, or auditors wishing to learn about the concepts of mode that dominate much of Asia, will be expected to contribute by analyzing their own transcriptions. The final project will combine the analysis of a major repertory of the student’s own choice and a paper interpreting that repertory. Students in all subdisciplines of music, as well as many who study the languages and cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, are welcome to take the proseminar.

MUSI 32416 Proseminar: Music in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1800

ROBERT KENDRICK

M 9:30-12:20 pm

Music at this point of early modern Europe raises some important cultural problems, ranging from the scientific revolution, to issues of gender, international connections, and performance practice. This proseminar attempts to address them by introducing students to primary sources, musical repertory, and important secondary literature. We will take special looks at music in Mantua, Venice, Dresden, and Paris. There will be individual projects on sources, a short writing assignment, reports on readings in class, and a take-home final.

MUSI 33416: Music and Globalization in Modern Latin America

PABLO PALOMINO

T,R 10:30-11:50 am

This course introduces students to the history of the globalization of Latin America from the perspective of the history of the region’s musical practices in the 20th century. Lectures, group work, readings, and an individual paper will deal with the circulation of music across national and cultural boundaries. The course focuses on both famous and obliterated histories of folk, classical, and urban musical traditions, diasporic music styles, entertainment corporations, music markets and technology, state policies, music pedagogy, cinema, Latin American musicology, musical nationalism, and musical diplomacy. Each week we will listen and discuss musical pieces in class to enable an active dialogue between history and sound. Musical training is welcome but not necessary to take this class. The emphasis is on the late 19th and the 20th centuries, but issues of colonial, early post-colonial, and 21st century music will also be considered.

“Musical practices” are approached here from the intersection of history, sociology and ethnomusicology, and as a wide range of dimensions related to material, economic, labor, public policy, aesthetic discourses, identity, and political forms. The course provides thus a historical framework to music students, and a consideration of music and musical sources to students in history and the social sciences.

The grade will consider class participation and a paper (15 pages) applying some of the readings and concepts discussed in class on a Latin American music-related object selected by the student - a recording, a score, a book, a film, or a painting.

MUSI 33516: Judeo-Islamic Musical Intersections

EDWIN SEROUSSI

M,W 1:30-2:30 pm

Following the inception of Islam in the early 7th century, most Jews at that time found themselves living under this new geo-political-religious power. This close multidenominational encounter continued without interruption, albeit in different numbers, until the 20th century.  The interaction between Islam and Judaism at all levels of culture was intense.  Music was one of major fields in which such a Judeo-Islamic exchange occurred.  This course will survey different areas of Judeo-Islamic musical contacts in vast geographical areas from the Maghreb to Central Asia, in diverse genres and contexts of musical performance, such as the synagogue, religious festivals, life cycle events, folk song, courtly traditions and modern popular music. Basic issues to be addressed are the study of music in ritual contexts, music as a marker of identities, music as a medium for religious experiences, music memory and conflict, music and colonialism, and music as a constituent of modernity outside Europe. Modern and postmodern constructions of the remote past, e.g. the “convinvecia” of Jews, Muslims and Christians in medieval Spain, will be discussed a-propos music.

Another topic is the fate of Jewish musical traditions from the Lands of Islam after their massive dislocations in the 20th century in genres such as musika mizrahit in Israel and the chanson franco-arabe in France.  The pervasive notion (especially in the field of “World Music”) that through music contemporary Jews and Muslims can (re-)enact reconciliation will be discussed critically.  Oral appreciation, analysis and interpretation of recorded and visual musical materials are the basis for this course that does not require proficiency in reading musical notation. A selection of reading assignment on the subject will supplement listening activities.

MUSI 33610: Music of the Caribbean

MELVIN BUTLER

T, R 9:00-10:20 am

This course covers the history, sonic character, and sociocultural contexts of important genres of Caribbean music. We will pay particular attention to the intersections of musical practice, social identity, and various forms of spiritual and political power. A recurring theme will be the role of music in sustaining transnational linkages between the Caribbean and the United States. Highlighting the cultivation of long-distance national identities and the migration of sound and practice to and from the Caribbean region, we will also work to understand contributions from African and European sources as they have interacted in terms of acculturation, creolization, syncretism,  hybridity, ritualization, and resistance. Discussions, lectures, reading material, and listening assignments will mostly concern the Anglophone, Francophone, and Creolophone Caribbean, but final projects may be devoted to other locales, according to students’ research interests.

MUSI 34000: Composition

Arranged with facutly

 

MUSI 34100 Seminar: Composition

AUGUSTA READ THOMAS

T 4:30-5:50 pm

 

MUSI 34600: Orchestration

MARTA PTASZYNSKA

Every other Monday (Weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9) 3:00-5:30 pm

 

MUSI 41000: Graduate Colloquium: Music

ANNE ROBERTSON

By arrangement

 

MUSI 41500 Seminar: Dissertation Proposal

BERTHO​LD HOECKNER

By arrangement

The goal of this seminar is to help doctoral students who have taken their Comprehensive Exams produce a dissertation proposal over the course of this academic year. The seminar meets every other week in Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. We will proceed from selecting and formulating a topic to planning and writing a proposal. Participants will regularly present abstracts, drafts, and versions of their proposal. Peer review will be an important part of the process.

MUSI 42216 Seminar: Racialization and Music

TRAVIS JACKSON

W 9:00-11:50 am

From static (and sometimes eugenicist) notions of race, to questions of ethnicity and assimilation, to concepts of anti-essentialism and racial formation, the processes that scholars now call racialization are—as much as sound, style, culture—intrinsic elements of social agents’ understandings of music-making. Drawing from work in history, anthropology, sociology, critical race theory and
critical whiteness studies, this seminar will start by exploring how modern discourses of racialization emerge from a long history of travel writing, colonial and postcolonial encounters, and other circulations of people and goods throughout the world. From there, its participants will examine a stylistically diverse series of cases from various places and times in order to develop a set of
flexible and critical strategies for interrogating how understandings of difference map onto, influence and find expression in musical practices.

MUSI 42816 Seminar: The Untold American History of the Modern Hebrew 'Folksong'

EDWIN SEROUSSI

T 1:30-4:20 pm

The establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 marked a decisive moment in the modern history of the Jewish people. However, this state was not established overnight. A long period of gestation whose beginning historians contest preceded 1948. In addition, a new Jewish culture emerged during this period. Its central tenet was the revival of Hebrew as a vernacular language. Hebrew songs were a major tool for the dissemination of the ideals and messages of this new politicized culture as much as they promoted the proficiency of their users in the language itself. Until now, research on the modern Hebrew song, variously named shir ‘ivri, zemer ‘ivri, and shir yisra’eli, was, with some notable exceptions, Israelocentric, secularist and stressed written sources. The seminar is designed to expand previous research by addressing the practice of the modern Hebrew song repertoire (including early Israeli popular music) beyond Israel, most especially in the USA, before and after 1948 stressing its sacralization, and focusing also on orality. This research project will take advantage of American resources available in archives of Jewish institutions in Chicago and other major cities. Raw materials will include Hebrew songsters produced for American Jewish consumption, the reconstruction of networks of song dissemination, memories, program notes of concerts, summer camp programs, synagogue leaflets and more.  The rise and decline of the "Palestinian" songs, as the Hebrew songs were marketed earlier in America, and the more recent Israeli song repertoire entails a deep understanding of the extremely complex and shifting relations between the American Jewry and the Zionist movement and its watershed, the State of Israel.  The seminar may also include, pending on feasibility, fieldwork with individuals who were involved in the promotion of Israeli music in America in different stages. Proficiency in Modern Hebrew is certainly an advantage but not a requirement.

MUSI 43416 Seminar: Rhythm and Meter

LAWRENCE ZBIKOWSKI

R 9:00-11:50 am

This seminar will explore the organization of musical materials through the resources provided by rhythm and meter. Although we shall give some consideration to historical and contemporary theories, our main focus will be on the development of theoretical models that can provide the basis for the analysis of a diverse range of music. Two intellectual commitments will inform the development of these models: the first involves an embodied approach to human cognitive processes (under the rubric of grounded cognition), which is of particular importance for understanding the processes of entrainment that support metrical understandings of musical rhythm. The second intellectual commitment involves a view of musical grammar that construes grammatical units as comprising form-function pairs. This view invites the theorist to consider not only specific features of musical utterances but also the motivations for forming these utterances in the first place.

The seminar will conclude with a mini-conference during eleventh week. Seminar papers (typically, a report of original research around 15–20 pages in length) must be turned in no later than July 31, 2015 or no grade for the seminar will be given.

MUSI 43600: Acoustics / Psychoacoustics / Music

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30-1:20 pm

This course will examine the theoretical foundations of musical acoustics, the generation, propagation and perception of sound. Students will have the opportunity to examine acoustical and psycho-acoustical theory as it applies to their area of specialization in composition, musicology, ethno-musicology and music theory through a series of lectures, experiments, laboratory demonstrations and group/individual projects.