Winter 2015 Courses

Winter 2015 Courses: Undergraduate | Graduate

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100: Introduction to Western Art Music

SETH BRODSKY

M/W 1:30-2:50 pm, LC 802

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts.

MUSI 10200: Introduction to World Music

MELVIN BUTLER, PHILIP BOHLMAN

1: Butler, M/W 1:30-2:50 pm, GoH 402
2: Bohlman, T/R 10:30-11:50 am, GoH 402

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts.

This course is cross-listed as CRES 10200.

MUSI 10300: Introduction to Music Materials/Design

TOMAS GUEGLIO-SACCONE, KATE PUKINSKIS

1: Gueglio-Saccone, M/W/F 10:30-11:20 am, LC 901
2: Pukinskis, T/R 3:00-4:20 pm, LC 901

In this variant of the introductory course in music, students explore the language of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and exercises in composition. A study of a wide diversity of musical styles serves as an incentive for student compositions in those styles.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts.

MUSI 10400: Introduction to Music Analysis/Criticism

BERTHOLD HOECKNER, STEVEN RINGS

1: Hoeckner, M/W 3:00 - 4:20 pm, LC 901
2: Rings, T/R 9:00 - 10:20 am, LC 901

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts.

MUSI 12100: Music in Western Civilization I: To 1750

ANNE ROBERTSON

M/W/F 9:30 - 10:20 am, Cobb 307

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. Separate discussion sections meet on Fridays.

This course is cross-listed as HIST 12700, SOSC 21100.

MUSI 15200: Harmony and Voice Leading - 2

DREW NOBILE

1: Nobile, M/W/F 10:30 - 11:20 am, GoH 402
2: Nobile, M/W/F 11:30 - 12:20 pm, GoH 402

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Notes/Prequisite(s): MUSI 15100 or consent of instructor. Students must also register for one of the following ear training lab sections: T/R 9:30-10:20 am, T/R 10:30-11:50 am, or M/W 4:30-5:20 pm.

MUSI 23215: Music in Mexico and Cuba, 1920-1945

ROBERT KENDRICK

T/R 10:30-11:50 am, GoH 205

The social and cultural conditions of these countries in the wake of the Mexican Revolution and Cuba's nominal independence also gave rise to many musical experiments, in addition to the better-known cases of visual arts and literature. This course looks at some of the music produced by César Chávez, Silvestre Revueltas, Alejandro García Caturla, and Amadeo Roldán in these two countries, in the context of contemporary history and aesthetics.

Notes/Prequisite(s): One of the following: LACS 163/348 or any 100-level Music course. Many materials will be in Spanish.

MUSI 23715: Music and Islam in South Asia

REGULA QURESHI

T/R 1:30-2:50 pm, GoH 402

Regula Burkhardt Qureshi serves as the University of Chicago's 2014-2015 Mellon Islamic Studies Visiting Professor. This course explores the breadth of South Asian musical expression with special attention to Islamic experience. Participants have the option to pursue small scale fieldwork projects within Chicago's thriving South Asian community. Readings will draw from a range of literature including ethnomusicology, area studies, religious studies and anthropology.

MUSI 24000: Composition Lessons

ANTHONY CHEUNG

Time, Location by Arrangement

 

MUSI 25115: Analysis of Music of the Classical Period

THOMAS CHRISTENSEN, GoH 205

T 9:00-10:20 am

In this class, we will attempt to understand the stylistic language and forms of late 18th-century music commonly called “Classical” (heavily centered upon–but by no means exclusive to–the Viennese triumvirate of Haydn, Mozart, and early Beethoven) through an extensive analysis of selected musical compositions. We will also consider issues regarding classical and national style, genre, topic, rhetoric, and performance. Our analyses will be complemented through a variety of readings by scholars such as Charles Rosen, Carl Dahlhaus, William Caplin, Leonard Ratner, Robert Gjerdingen, and others.

Notes/Prequisite(s): Any 10000-level Music course. Open to nonmajors with consent of instructor. You will be expected to listen to and study the music assigned for each week. (Virtually all of the music will be easily accessible online for both print and audio versions, although it would not be a bad idea to start building your own library of canonical scores and recordings.) You will also have 2 or 3 short readings that will (for the most part) be on a chalk site. Several short assignments will be given throughout the quarter (details to be handed out in class) related to our class discussions and readings. In addition, there will be a final analysis project. (There will be no final exam.) Grading is based on the following: Short assignments (50%),final project (40%), class participation (10%)

MUSI 25514: Chamber Music

AMY BRIGGS

W 1:30-2:50 pm, LC 901

In this course we will examine several specific works from the standard chamber music repertoire (for example, duos, trios, quartets of Mozart, Brahms, Schumann, and the like) as scholars and performers. While readings from historical and analytical perspectives will be included, our primary focus will be on performance, and the inherent challenges of realizing the composer's intentions as authentically, naturally, and effectively as possible. To this end, performance practices as well as the psychology of performing will be considered. The course will culminate in a final concert performance of works examined; each student will participate as a performer in one of the assigned pieces.

Notes/Prequisite(s): Students must have studied their instrument privately for several years, read music fluently, play at an intermediate/advanced level, and audition week 1. This is a 2-quarter course, and 100 units will be awarded upon completion of the spring quarter.

MUSI 26100: Introduction to Composition

ANTHONY CHEUNG

M/W 1:30-2:50 pm, GoH 205

This course introduces some of the basic problems in musical composition through a series of simple exercises.

Notes/Prequisite(s): MUSI 15300 or consent of instructor.

MUSI 26400: Introduction to Computer Music - 2

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30-1:20 pm, GoH 205

This two-quarter course of study gives students in any discipline the opportunity to explore the techniques and aesthetics of computer-generated/assisted music production. During the first quarter, students learn the basics of digital synthesis, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI), and programming. These concepts and skills are acquired through lecture, demonstration, reading, and a series of production and programming exercises. Weekly lab tutorials and individual lab time in the department’s computer music studio are in addition to scheduled class time.

Notes/Prequisite(s): MUSI 26300 or consent of instructor.

MUSI 26715: Sixteenth Century Counterpoint

JAMES KALLEMBACH

T/R 12:00-1:20 pm, GoH 205

This course is an introduction to the theory, analysis, and composition of modal counterpoint using texts that uses examples by sixteenth-century theorists (i.e., Zarlino) and composers (i.e., Josquin, Lassus, Palestrina). Techniques include cantus firmus, canon, and modal mixture. Students read sources, analyze passages, and compose (and improvise) counterpoint in two to four parts.

Notes/Prequisite(s): Completion of or current enrollment in Musi 15100-15300, or consent of instructor.

MUSI 27200: Topics: Hist Of Western Music - 2

ANA SANCHEZ ROJO

M/W 3:00-4:20 pm, GoH 402

This sequence is a three-quarter investigation into Western art music, with primary emphasis on the vocal and instrumental repertories of Western Europe and the United States. MUSI 27200 addresses topics in music from 1600 to 1800, including opera, sacred music, the emergence of instrumental genres, the codification of tonality, and the Viennese classicism of Haydn and Mozart.

Notes/Prequisite(s): MUSI 14300 or 15300. Open to non-majors with consent of instructor.

MUSI 28000: Orchestral Conducting (UG)

BARBARA SCHUBERT

M 1:30-2:50 pm, LC 703

This two-quarter introductory course focuses on the on the art as well as the craft of Orchestral Conducting. Designed primarily for undergraduate students who have had experience playing in an orchestra, wind ensemble, chamber group, or choral ensemble, the curriculum includes practical instruction, podium experience, background reading, and concert/conductor observation. Through a combination of classroom work, individual instruction, and supplemental ensemble sessions, students will gain significant practical experience in conducting. Weekly class meetings will incorporate singing, keyboard work, and instrumental participation by class members and guest musicians. Important technical exercises will be assigned every week, along with modest reading selections. Several short papers and classroom presentations will be assigned each quarter, in conjunction with background readings and classroom topics. The overall goal of the course is to promote the students’ understanding and appreciation of the technical responsibilities and the artistic possibilities of the conductor’s role, and to promote a basic proficiency in the craft of conducting an instrumental ensemble.

MUSI 28500: Musicianship Skills

PHILIP KLOECKNER

F 1:30-2:20 pm

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

Notes/Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15300 and Consent of Instructor. Credit given In Spring after completion of year's work.

MUSI 29700: Independent Study

Instructor, Time, Location by Arrangement

 

MUSI 29900: Senior Research: Music

Instructor, Time, Location by Arrangement

 

GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 31300: Analysis of Twentieth Century Music

STEVEN RINGS

M/W 3:00 - 4:20 pm, GoH 205

This course offers an intensive study in analytical and theoretical approaches to 20th-century art music. Students will develop fluency in the analytical and theoretical tools that typically fall under the rubric of “set theory”—the lingua franca of post-tonal analysis—and explore the ways in which that apparatus can be applied profitably in the analysis of diverse 20th-century repertories. We will seek to foster a critical awareness of both the virtues and limits of set-theoretic approaches, employing alternative means of discussing the music at hand when that is warranted. In addition to readings—which will be drawn both from the scholarly literature and from texts on post-tonal theory—coursework will consist of weekly assignments (including problem sets), brief analytical presentations, a midterm, a final, and a final paper.

MUSI 32800: Proseminar in Music: 190​0 - 2000

SETH BRODSKY​

M 9:00 - 11:50 am, Location TBD

Notes/Prequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

MUSI 33515: Music and Islam in South Asia

REGULA QURESHI

T/R 1:30 - 2:50 pm, GoH 402

Regula Burkhardt Qureshi serves as the University of Chicago's 2014-2015 Mellon Islamic Studies Visiting Professor. This course explores the breadth of South Asian musical expression with special attention to Islamic experience. Participants have the option to pursue small scale fieldwork projects within Chicago's thriving South Asian community. Readings will draw from a range of literature including ethnomusicology, area studies, religious studies and anthropology.

MUSI 34000: Composition

MARTA PTASZYNSKA, ANTHONY CHEUNG, SHULAMIT RAN

Time, Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required.

MUSI 34100: Seminar - Composition

ANTHONY CHEUNG

​T 4:30 - 5:50 pm, LC 901

 

MUSI 34800: Intro to Computer Music 2

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30 - 1:20 pm, GoH 205

This two-quarter course of study gives students in any discipline the opportunity to explore the techniques and aesthetics of computer-generated/assisted music production. During the first quarter, students learn the basics of digital synthesis, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI), and programming. These concepts and skills are acquired through lecture, demonstration, reading, and a series of production and programming exercises. Weekly lab tutorials and individual lab time in the department’s computer music studio are in addition to scheduled class time.

Notes/Prequisites: MUSI 26300 or consent of instructor. Rudimentary musical skills (but not technical knowledge) required. Basic Macintosh skills helpful. This course is offered in alternate years.

MUSI 42115: Music and Global Nationalisms

PHILIP BOHLMAN

​M 1:30 - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

Music demonstrates sweeping power to engender emblems of the modern nation-state, making it at times impossible to separate music from nationalism. The largest musical spectacle and competition of the world, the Eurovision Song Contest, pits nation against nation, while athletic and cultural competitions like the Olympics and the World Cup are punctuated by the sounding of national anthems. Musical nationalism activates both commonality and conflict, the political paradox that nations are at once alike and different. Inextricably bound to the nation, music becomes national and nationalist through processes that reflect identities that are indefinite and fragile, subject to the shifting of aesthetic and political borders. In this seminar we examine one of the most unassailable and least understood of all properties of world music, its complex connections to the modern nation-state.

The musical path to the nation-state is historical from its beginnings. In the historical imagination of the nation, folk songs begin in obscure moments of the past, gradually acquiring the attributes of linguistic and religious nationalism, while increasingly demonstrating the potential to encode these as national epic. The geographical location of national music draws attention to national borders while shoring up the collective symbols at the center: the national language, the use of music in state ritual, the distinctive sounds that differentiate one nation from its neighbors and from the rest of the world. The power to distinguish the nation accrues to music at particularly important moments in political history: Rabindranath Tagore’s synthesis of folk song for Bengali nationalism in colonial India; the collecting of national epic by Elias Lönnrot and Vuk Stefanović Karadžić in northern and southern Europe; A. Z. Idelsohn’s musical mapping of the Jewish diaspora for modern Israel; the ideological transformation of sacred sound into religious nationalism for Islamic statehood; the canonization of classical- and popular-music repertories alike—gamelan in Indonesia, fado in Portugal, samba in Brazil—to mobilize national agenda.

Taking the considerable body of scholarship on music and nationalism in Europe as a point of departure, we use this seminar to examine the distinctions between the national and the nationalist in music by considering them in national contexts beyond Europe. Post-colonial nations in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean turn to music to chart distinctive musical routes toward the nation. National music academies, for example in Tunisia, Turkey, and Iran, establish pedagogical and public contexts for experiencing the national repertory, the ma’lūf, makam, and the radif. National repertories both enhance and encumber the relations between modern nation-states, sounding them in similar ways as national anthems are played, sharpening their differences and animosities in the countless national musical competitions that have proliferated in the twenty-first century. Nationalism and modernity might seem antithetical to world music, and it is our task in this seminar to examine the aesthetic and political questions of why this has decidedly not been the case. In the course of the seminar students will cross the religious, linguistic, and political boundaries that are contested by nationalism. We shall seek to understand why global nationalisms reside not at great distance from folk song, world music, and popular music, but rather continue to bear witness to the politics of difference in the twenty-first century.

Students from disciplines across the divisions are welcome in this seminar.

MUSI 43415: Mu​sic and Meaning

LAWRENCE ZBIKOWSKI

T 9:00 - 11:50 am, JRL 264

 

MUSI 44115: Melodrama Across Media

MARTHA FELDMAN and JAMES CHANDLER

R 1:30 - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

It has been almost forty years since Peter Brooks released his pathbreaking and influential book, The Melodramatic Imagination: Balzac, Henry James, and the Mode of Excess (1975). Over these decades, and partly on account of Brooks's important arguments, melodrama has not only undergone critical rehabilitation; it has also become perhaps the most important category for those who would link twentieth-century cinema with the century that came before them, and as a category that crosses media and cultural boundaries. But there is a lot of work yet to be done. First, the deep musical roots of melodrama were scarcely glimpsed in Brooks’s study.They have been investigated by musicologists and music historians, but those studies have generally not been integrated into the former, however, nor into a larger cultural history or “media archaeology” of the sort toward which Brooks’s book gestured. Secondly, melodrama's mode of excess has revealing connections with a sentimental mode of moderation that features emotion mediated by reciprocal sympathy. We will explore how the sentimental sets the conditions for melodrama's emergence around the time of the French Revolution, or even, like its close cousin the Gothic involves the revenge of heightened passions on sentiments in the wake of the Reign of Terror. Still, even if there is truth in such a proposition, it needs to be qualified by the recognition that melodrama continued to co-exist with sentimental structures through figures like Mary Shelley and Dickens and into the age of cinema. The story of melodrama, in short, becomes richer and more complex when melodrama's Manichaean extremes of character, gesture, and style are understood to evolve from, and with, the moderating effects of "putting oneself in the place of the other." Finally, there have been some interesting efforts to gesture from cinema back to the deeper history of melodrama. In the preface to his 1995 second edition, Brooks notes that his book appeared almost simultaneously with an essay by film-studies scholar Thomas Elsaesser about the nineteenth-century origins of cinematic melodrama. Nonetheless, we are persuaded that the story of melodrama on the screen (that of cinema or television or hand-held device) still has much to gain from wider and deeper cultural investigations of the sort that we propose to offer in this seminar. Combined with the story of cinema, music and indeed music histories, in different instances of what we variously dub melo-dramas, reveal the critical connections that this mode recognizes by virtue of medial breaks between singing and speaking--whether in a German Mozart opera, the verse that transitions to the “fully musical” chorus of a jazz song, or the funk or blues number that devolves into into varieties of speech talk (think James Brown or Nina Simone). Such instances will help us think about what we understand melodrama across media to be and how we understand it to operate for different makers and viewers.

Notes/Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required.

MUSI 44415: Music, Cinem​a, Meta-Media

BERTHOLD HOECKNER​

F 9:30 - 12:20 pm, JRL 264

This graduate research seminar will explore the relationship between music and cinema from the perspective of meta-media. We approach meta-media in two ways: more narrowly, through meta-films, that is, films about film as an audiovisual medium that makes prominent use of sound and music; and more broadly, as a practice that involves both the original medium and its extension into other or new media. We will explore these two approaches in conversation with established critical concepts and film-theoretical methodologies ranging from utopia to psychoanalysis. Participants will watch one to two films per week, prepare readings for seminar sessions, and present a research paper at a mini-conference in Week 11.

Notes/Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required. Screenings of films will be Mondays in JRL 264 at 7:00 pm.