Winter 2014 Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100 Intro: Western Art Music

ABIGAIL FINE, MARIA JOSEFA VELASCO

01 Fine: TR 3:00 - 4:20 pm, LC 901
02 Velasco: TR 1:30 - 2:50 pm, LC 901

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two session of class.

MUSI 10200 Introduction to World Music

MELVIN BUTLER, TRAVIS JACKSON, KALEY MASON

01 Butler: TR 9:00 - 10:20 am, GoH 402
02 Jackson: TR 9:00 - 10:20 pm, JRL 264
03 Mason: TR 10:30 - 11:50 am, LC 901

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 10300 Intro: Music Materials / Design

ANTHONY CHEUNG

TR 10:30 - 11:50 am, GoH 402

In this variant of the introductory course in music, students explore the language of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and exercises in composition. A study of a wide diversity of musical styles serves as an incentive for student compositions in those styles.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 10400 Intro: Music Analysis / Criticism

BERTHOLD HOECKNER

TR 9:00 - 10:20 am, LC 901

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 12100 Music In Western Civ - 1

KATARZYNA GROCHOWSKA

MWF 9:30 - 10:20 am, C 307

Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): During the Friday class time, students meet in separate labs in GOH205, GOH402, C307 or C309. The GOH205 lab meets Friday 11:30-12:20.

MUSI 15200 Harmony and Voice Leading - 2

DREW NOBILE

01: MWF 10:30 - 11:20 am, GoH 402
02: MWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, GoH 402

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Notes/Prequisite(s): MUSI 15100 or consent of instructor. Students must also attend a weekly hour-long ear training lab, at alternative times Tuesday 10:30 to 11:20, Wednesday 12:30 to 1:20, or Thursday 9:30 to 10:20.

MUSI 23300 Introduction to the Social and Cultural Study of Music

MELVIN BUTLER

TR 3:00 - 4:20 pm, GoH 402

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

MUSI 24000 Composition Lessons

ANTHONY CHEUNG

Time / Location by Arrangement

This course consists of individual weekly composition lessons.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): MUSI 26100 or Consent of Instructor

MUSI 25300 Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music

PETER SMUCKER

TR 1:30 - 2:50 pm, GoH 402

This course introduces theoretical and analytical approaches to twentieth-century music. The core of the course involves learning a new theoretical apparatus--often called "set theory"--and exploring how best to apply that apparatus analytically to pieces by composers such as Schoenberg, Bartk, and Stravinsky. We also explore the relevance of the theoretical models to music outside of the high-modernist canon, including some jazz. The course provides an opportunity to confront some foundational questions regarding what it means to "theorize about music."

MUSI 25514 Chamber Music

AMY BRIGGS

MW 1:30 - 2:50 pm, LC 901

In this course we will examine several specific works from the standard chamber music repertoire (for example, duos, trios, quartets of Mozart, Brahms, Schumann, and the like) as scholars and performers.  While readings from historical and analytical perspectives will be included, our primary focus will be on performance, and the inherent challenges of realizing the composer's intentions as authentically, naturally, and effectively as possible.  To this end, performance practices as well as the psychology of performing will be considered.  The course will culminate in a final concert performance of works examined; each student will participate as a performer in one of the assigned pieces.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Performance requirement.  Students should be instrumentalists or vocalists of at least intermediate level who have had prior study in Western Classical music.

MUSI 26900 18th Century Counterpoint

MARTA PTASZYNSKA

MW 1:30 - 2:50 pm, GoH 205

This is a practical course for learning the art of fugue writing that concentrates on writing different types of fugues and on short pieces involving different types of imitation. The material is based on Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, Goldberg Variations, Das Musikalische Opfer, and Die Kunst der Fuge.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Musi 15300 Or Consent Of Instructor

MUSI 28000 Orchestral Conducting

JAMES KALLEMBACH

TR 3:00 - 4:20 pm, GoH 409

 

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

PHILLIP KLOECKNER

F 1:30 - 2:20 pm, JRL 264

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

Notes/Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15300 and Consent of Instructor. Credit given In Spring after completion of year's work.

MUSI 29700 Independent Study: Music

Time / Location by Arrangement

This course is intended for students who wish to pursue specialized readings in music or to do advanced work in composition.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Consent Instructor and Director,of UG Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading & Research Consent Form.

MUSI 29900 Senior Research: Music

Time / Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Consent Instructor and Director of UG Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading & Research Consent Form.

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GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 30000 Reading Course: Music

Time / Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor; Enter section from faculty list. College Reading and Research form required.

MUSI 31100 Tonal Analysis

THOMAS CHRISTENSEN

MW 3:00 - 4:20 pm, GoH 402

In this course, fundamental tools of advanced tonal analysis will be introduced and applied to a variety of repertoires. Schenker’s influential theory of linear analysis will be the main focus as we begin to master its principles and applications. But this will not simply be a course in Schenkerian theory, as we’ll also consider the limits of that theory and attempt to supplement it where possible with other perspectives. We will also discuss–and practice–the art of good analytic writing and rhetoric through the reading (and emulation) of model analyses. Note: Music 311 is conceived as a preparation and foundation for Music 312, which will follow in the Spring semester, and which will build directly upon the analytic models and repertoire introduced in Music 311. Requirements: Weekly analytic assignments and a short analytic paper due at the end of the quarter. The required text is Cadwallader and Gagne’s Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis (second edition; available at the University Bookstore).

MUSI 31300 Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music

PETER SMUCKER

TR 1:30 - 2:50 pm, GoH 402

This course introduces theoretical and analytical approaches to twentieth-century music. The core of the course involves learning a new theoretical apparatus--often called "set theory"--and exploring how best to apply that apparatus analytically to pieces by composers such as Schoenberg, Bartk, and Stravinsky. We also explore the relevance of the theoretical models to music outside of the high-modernist canon, including some jazz. The course provides an opportunity to confront some foundational questions regarding what it means to "theorize about music."

MUSI 32800 Proseminar in Music: 1900-2000

SETH BRODSKY

F 9:00 - 11:50 am, LC 901

 

MUSI 33004 Proseminar: Ethnomusicology

PHILIP V. BOHLMAN

T 9:00 - 11:50 am, GoH 205

Ethnomusicology in the twenty-first century also claims an historical longue durée that stretches across continents and cultures, providing us with the point of departure in the early weeks of the proseminar. In the first sessions we consider the history and historiography of ethnomusicology. Beginning with concepts of ontology and origins in music—the shaping of music’s multiple and culturally situated identities—we explore the ways in which encounter, collection, and analysis developed in such ways that music could have multiple forms as an object. The formation of repertories and genres that lent themselves to ethnomusicological study and theoretical formulation (e.g., Johann Gottfried Herder’s Volkslieder, “folk songs,” in the late eighteenth century, and the transnational appropriation of world music through the mass media in the late twentieth century) provide a common thread unifying the first part of the proseminar.

With the sessions in the second part of the course we navigate the present and move toward the future, where we explore the complex disciplinarity of ethnomusicology. The critical methodological presence of fieldwork and ethnography guide us into the themes of the sec-ond part. In the final weeks we turn toward the disciplinary directions of the new ethnomu-sicology at the turn of the present century, when ethnomusicological interest global popular music and sound studies led to further expansion of ethnomusicology as a field, which none-theless meant that ethnomusicologists would different aesthetic and ethical questions as they entered new domains of the human sciences. Our reading for the proseminar will center around The Cambridge History of World Music, which appears in December and will be available electronically. Final projects for the proseminar will involve ethnography in one form or an-other.

MUSI 33311 Introduction to the Social and Cultural Study of Music

MELVIN BUTLER

Time / Location By Arrangement

 

MUSI 34000 Composition

MARTA PTASZYNSKA, AUGUSTA THOMAS, ANTHONY CHEUNG

Time / Location By Arrangement

 

MUSI 34100 Seminar: Composition

MARTA PTASZYNSKA

M 4:30 - 5:50 pm, GoH 205

 

MUSI 36700 Imagination and Expertise in Composition

AUGUSTA THOMAS

T 4:30 - 7:20 pm, GoH 205

This interactive, laboratory‐style, practical course featuring performing musicians, is designed for advanced composers to practice and hone the nuances of their musical craft. Concerned with fluency of invention, creativity, skill, dexterity, technique, and nuance, highest priority is given to individuality, personal vision, and maturity of a unique artistic voice. Composers, having fulfilled specific projects as assigned for each session, will (every class) hear their music sight-­‐read by excellent musicians. The progression and integration of creative projects over the two quarters are cumulative, allowing each composer the option to be constructing a composition (or a part of a composition.) Each project (set of relationships) expands and multiplies into the next. The final class will be a workshop-­style recital.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Professional skill with music notation. Win-Spr 2014. 1st class on Jan 7, GOH205, then in GOH409 on Jan 21, Feb 4,18; Mar 4, Apr 1,15, May 6,20,27. Office hours in GOH205 4:30-7:20pm on Jan 14,28, Feb 11,25, Mar 11, Apr 8,22,29, May 13, Jun 10.

MUSI 41000 Graduate Colloquium: Music

ROBERT KENDRICK

Time / Location By Arrangement

 

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

BERTHOLD HOECKNER

Time / Location By Arrangement

The purpose of this seminar is to assist students (typically in their third year) in crafting a dissertation proposal, gaining critical feedback from their peers, and honing compelling research projects. The meeting schedule of the seminar will be flexible: beginning in the fourth week of Autumn term, we will meet about once every two weeks; it may be, however, that we pick up the tempo a bit during Winter term, such that during Spring term we can slow it down a bit to allow students more time to work with their advisors on the formulation of their research projects.

MUSI 42014 The Origins of Music

PHILIP V. BOHLMAN

R 9:00 - 11:50 am, GoH 205

The search for the origins of music provides the conceptual foundations for the metaphysics of music. When, where, and how music crosses from the universe of physics to metaphysics, to the world of perception, provides a set of inquiries that converge as the ontologies of music we shall investigate in this seminar. The search for the beginnings of music is inseparable from the foundational myths and texts of world religions. The beginnings of music determine the very transformations of silence and sound into the enunciation of music as human. The search for the beginnings of music also provides the impetus for thought about music, historically in early theoretical writings on music, such as, the Sanskrit Nāṭyaśāstra from the early centuries of the Common Era, and the aḥādīth with their accounts of the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the inscription of the Qur’an.

The inseparability of origins from religious thought serves to open the seminar, with its focus on myth in and as music, above all the ways in which sung epic contains the foundational myths of religion and society. The seminar will then move between and among several world religions, especially South Asian religion (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism), the Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), and the shamanistic belief systems of circumpolar indigenous cultures. From the emphasis on religion in the opening sessions the seminar will move into the sciences of music at its midpoint. The seminar will close with sessions devoted to perhaps the most persistent of all ontological questions about music, the degree to which it might be universal. From these questions emerge the aesthetics of world music, with basic distinctions between similarity and difference contrasting with the Enlightenment formulation of the first world music, folk music. The seminar concludes by locating music’s meanings in religious and philosophical domains.

Students from all disciplines in the Music Department will be welcome, as will students from other departments of the Humanities, the Social Sciences, and the Divinity School.

MUSI 42614 Affective Labor

KALEY MASON

W 9:00 - 11:50 am, JRL 264

 

MUSI 43414 Words and Music

LAWRENCE KBIKOWSKI

M 9:00 - 11:50 am, JRL 264

By most accounts, words and music have different functions in human cultures. Both serve as means of communication (broadly understood), and both manifest across the range of human behaviors, from the everyday to the exceptional. Both have also been subjected to a range of theoretical approaches—some more systematic than others— which attempt to account for the principles which guide their organization into coherent utterances.

This seminar aims to explore the communicative resources offered by words and music in three ways. First, through an investigation of the distinctive features of each medium, using the models provided by recent work on construction grammars for language, and on the spontaneous gestures that accompany speech. Second, through analytical studies of the ways words and music compete and cooperate with one another in a variety of expressive genres. And third, through research projects developed by students in the seminar.

Students should approach the course with ideas for seminar papers in mind. These ideas can then be re-shaped beyond all recognition during the first three weeks of the course, prior to the submission of topics for seminar papers at our fourth meeting. Seminar work will consist of a wide and possibly overwhelming range of readings, as well as applications of some of the less intuitive ideas therein to analyses of words and/or music. These activities, together with occasional presentations by outside interlocutors, will form the basis of seminar discussions. The seminar will conclude with a mini-conference on words and music during eleventh week, in which seminar students will present their initial findings to fellow seminaristas as well as to interested bystanders.

MUSI 44014 Voice: Subjective, Material, Abstract

MARTHA FELDMAN, DAVID LEVIN

R 1:30 - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

This collaborative interdisciplinary seminar seeks to explore some of the functions assumed by the voice as it takes shape in a bewildering variety of forms--expressive, corporeal, spiritual, material, ephemeral, performative, and ideological—and in an ever widening range of media (vocal music, literature, film, but also digital, recorded forms). Given the broad range of approaches and media that might be considered under such a large umbrella, our work will be less synoptic than “punctual,” lighting down on some revealing moments in the phenomenon that is “voice” in order to hear how voice has resounded in various practices, performative and critical. Principal authors to be read include Carolyn Abbate, Roland Barthes, Stanley Cavell, Adriana Caverero, Michel Chion, James Q. Davies, Mladen Dolar, Nina Eidsheim, Brian Kane, Wayne Koestenbaum, and Kaja Silverman.

The first half of the seminar includes five sessions led by Levin and Feldman; the second will consist of four sessions on particular themes led by groups of students, who will assign readings and listenings, etc., provide background and critical views on them in class sessions, and lead class discussions. The last session will be devoted to a one-day conference at which participants will present the results of individual research. Conference papers will be turned into polished written forms for submission within a week after the conference, taking account of feedback gathered at the conference.

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