Fall 2014 Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100 Intro to Western Art Music

WOO CHAN LEE, ELIZABETH HOPKINS

1: Lee, T/R 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, LC 901
2: Hopkins, M/W/F 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm, GoH 402

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts. 

MUSI 10200 Intro to World Music

WILLIAM FABER, LAURA SHEARING

1: Faber, M/W 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm, LC 901
2: Shearing, T/R 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm, LC 901

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts. 

MUSI 10300 Intro to Music Materials/Design

ANTHONY CHEUNG, MARTA PTASZYNSKA

1: Cheung, T/R 10:30 am - 11:50 am, LC 901
2: Ptaszynska, M/W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, LC 703

In this variant of the introductory course in music, students explore the language of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and exercises in composition. A study of a wide diversity of musical styles serves as an incentive for student compositions in those styles.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts. 

MUSI 10400 Intro to Music Analysis/Criticism

BERTHOLD HOECKNER, MAXWELL SILVA

1: Hoeckner, T/R 9:00 am - 10:20 am, LC 901
2: Silva, T/R 12:00 pm - 1:20pm, LC 901

This course aims to develop students' analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the Gen'l Ed requirement in dramatic, musical, & visual arts. 

MUSI 15100 Harmony and Voice Leading 1

DREW NOBILE

1: Nobile, M/W/F 10:30 am - 11:20 am, GoH 402
2: Nobile, M/W/F 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, GoH 402

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Proficiency in reading music or consent of instructor. Students will also attend a one-hour ear training lab twice a week (T/R 9:30am - 10:20am LC 703, T/R 10:30am - 11:20am LC 703, M/W 4:30pm - 5:20pm GoH 402) as well as a 15-minute keyboard lesson (arranged individually).

MUSI 22600 Beethoven

PHIL GOSSETT

T/R 10:30 am - 11:50 am, GoH 402

This course examines representative works chosen from all the genres Beethoven cultivated to demonstrate the ways the composer brought the stylistic models of classicism (i.e., those of Mozart and Haydn) into the new artistic climate of early romanticism. 

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level music course.

MUSI 23304 Intro to Social and Cultural Studies of Music

MELVIN BUTLER

T/R 9:00 am - 10:20 am, GoH 402

This course provides an introduction to ethnomusicology and related disciplines with an emphasis on the methods and contemporary practice of social and cultural analysis. The course reviews a broad selection of writing on non-Western, popular, vernacular, and "world-music" genres from a historical and theoretical perspective, clarifying key analytical terms (i.e., "culture," "subculture," "style," "ritual," "globalization") and methods (i.e., ethnography, semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism). In the last part of the course, students learn and develop component skills of fieldwork documentation and ethnographic writing.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level music course.

MUSI 23714 "Lady Jane" in Warsaw: Communism Brought Down by Rock and Roll

KINGA KOSMALA

M/W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, Cobb 201

Rock and punk music played a significant role in subverting the power of the Soviet system among the youth cultures of the Eastern bloc countries. These two types of music became extremely interesting artistic and subversive cultural realms during the Cold War in Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, and other countries of the Bloc. “The Plastic People of the Universe” from Czechoslovakia, “Maanam” and “Perfect” from Poland, “Time Machine” from the USSR, among others, accompanied and unified the younger generations in searching for their identity in the reality of the totally controlling and ominous communist state. Music became an integral part of young people’s lives and actively participated in the crucial social change of 1989 – the fall of the communist system. Massive popularity of Western rock and punk music behind the Iron Curtain along with the music created by artists from the Eastern Bloc will be explored in detail in this course.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): This course is a crosslist of POLI 22410.

MUSI 24000 Composition Lessons

ANTHONY CHEUNG

Time / Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): MUSI 26100 or consent of instructor required.

MUSI 25600 Jazz Theory and Improvisation

MWATA BOWDEN

M/W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, LC 901

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course and ability to read music or consent of instructor. 

MUSI 26300 Intro to Computer Music 1

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30 am - 1:20 pm, GoH 205

This two-quarter course of study gives students in any discipline the opportunity to explore the techniques and aesthetics of computer-generated/assisted music production. During the first quarter, students learn the basics of digital synthesis, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI), and programming. These concepts and skills are acquired through lecture, demonstration, reading, and a series of production and programming exercises. Weekly lab tutorials and individual lab time in the department’s computer music studio are in addition to scheduled class time.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

MUSI 27100 Topics: History of Western Music 1

MARTHA FELDMAN

M/W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, GoH 402

This sequence is a three-quarter investigation into Western art music, with primary emphasis on the vocal and instrumental repertories of Western Europe and the United States.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level music course or consent of instructor.

MUSI 28500 Musicianship Skills

PHILIP KLOECKNER

F 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm, GoH 402

This is a yearlong course in ear training, keyboard progressions, realization of figured basses at the keyboard, and reading of chamber and orchestral scores. Classes each week consist of one dictation lab (sixty minutes long) and one keyboard lab (thirty minutes long).

Prerequisite(s): MUSI 15300. Open only to students who are majoring in music. Note(s): 100 units credit are granted only after successful completion of the year's work.

MUSI 28914 Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter

DAVID LEVIN

T/R 3:00 - 4:20 pm, LC 701

In July, 2015, the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C Professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’s Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Cross listed as GRMN 28914/38914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, TAPS 28417.

MUSI 29700 Independent Study: Music

Instructor TBA

Time / Location by arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Enter section from faculty list. College Reading/Research form required.

MUSI 29900 Senior Research: Music

Instructor TBA

Time / Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Enter section from faculty list. College Reading/Research form required.

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GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 30000 Reading and Research

Instructor TBA

Time / Location by Arrangement

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Enter section from faculty list. College Reading/Research form required.

MUSI 30904 Beethoven

PHIL GOSSETT

T/R 10:30 am - 11:50 am, GoH 402

This course examines representative works chosen from all the genres Beethoven cultivated to demonstrate the ways the composer brought the stylistic models of classicism (i.e., those of Mozart and Haydn) into the new artistic climate of early romanticism. 

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Any 10000-level music course or the ability to read music. 

MUSI 31515 Ethnomusicology Analysis: Middle East and South Asia

PHILIP BOHLMAN

M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

In this proseminar in analysis we examine the concepts and structures of mode that stretch from South Asia across the Middle East to the Mediterranean. We concentrate our comparative study on Arabic maqām, Turkish makam, Persian radif, North Indian/Hindustani rāg, and South Indian/Karnatak rāga. Historically, processes and patterns of exchange between classical, popular, and folk musics in these regions have shaped repertories ideas of melody and form, vocal practice and instrumental accompaniment, improvisation and composition, bearing witness to similarities and cross-influences no less than to distinctive local and regional music cultures. To know and understand the music cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, as well as Muslim regions of Central and East Asia, it is indispensable also to understand the practices of improvisation and composition we analyze in this proseminar.

Our own approach to mode will begin with study of historical approaches to music theory, Arabic, Persian, and Turkish treatises in the Middle East, and the great Sanskrit works on music and the arts, such as the Nāṭyaśāstra. Students will also acquire critical approaches to analysis through a series of transcription and analysis exercises. All students participating in the proseminar, whether ethnomusicologists, for whom the course is a requirement, or auditors wishing to learn about the concepts of mode that dominate much of Asia, will be expected to contribute by analyzing their own transcriptions. The final project will combine the analysis of a major repertory of the student’s own choice and a paper interpreting that repertory. Students in all subdisciplines of music, as well as many who study the languages and cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, are welcome to take the proseminar.

MUSI 32201 Proseminar: Music to 1300

ROBERT KENDRICK

R 9:00 am - 11:50 am, JRL 264

This course covers selected topics in the history and notation of monophonic and early polyphonic music. Topics discussed include the development of Gregorian chant; the place of singing in the liturgy; the use of chant as foundation for polyphony; the genres of polyphony that appeared in the 9th through 13th centuries; the notation of monophonic and polyphonic music from its earliest appearances in theoretical and southern French sources through the development of the late-thirteenth-century motet; composers; oral transmission; bilingualism; memory; and allegory. The recent availability of major sources of monophonic and polyphonic music online (e.g. the Florence MS) will greatly facilitate class discussion as well as completion of written assignments.

MUSI 32408 Proseminar: Renaissance

MARTHA FELDMAN

R 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

This course explores objects, issues, and contexts for European music in the period 1450-1600, concentrating on the musical works, textual issues, cultural meanings, transmission, and historical circulation. Particular problems that will occupy us include oral vs. written traditions, relationships between composition, memory, and improvisation, the consolidation and diversification of vernacular genres (with emphasis on Italy), and interactions between Europe and the Americas. Students will do work with digital resources, and will write review essays on aspects of recent literature on the period in keeping with their skills and interests.

MUSI 33004 Proseminar: Ethnomusicology

MELVIN BUTLER

W 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm, JRL 264

This proseminar is designed to acquaint graduate students with key issues and concepts pertinent to the field of ethnomusicology. We will begin by briefly examining the historical development of late 19th-century vergleichende Musikwissenschaft (comparative musicology) and its impact on present-day studies of people making music. Our readings and discussions will then center on some of the theoretical and methodological debates that have shaped ethnomusicological scholarship over the past half-century. Students will gain familiarity with a variety of approaches to music in/as culture, while learning to generate and critique the kinds of research questions ethnomusicologists pose. The course also seeks to provide an understanding of how the discipline is evolving as it is (re)situated in relation to historical musicology, anthropology, performance studies, and other branches of inquiry within the humanities and social sciences. 

MUSI 34700 Intro to Computer Music 1

HOWARD SANDROFF

W 10:30 am - 1:20 pm, GoH 205

This two-quarter course of study gives students in any discipline the opportunity to explore the techniques and aesthetics of computer-generated/assisted music production. During the first quarter, students learn the basics of digital synthesis, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI), and programming. These concepts and skills are acquired through lecture, demonstration, reading, and a series of production and programming exercises. Weekly lab tutorials and individual lab time in the department’s computer music studio are in addition to scheduled class time.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

MUSI 35014 Art and Public Life

W. J. T. MITCHELL, THEASTER GATES

M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm, LC 802

The aim of this seminar-colloquium will be to work through some of the most advanced thinking on ideas about publics and their relation to questions of community, politics, society, culture, and the arts. From John Dewey through Hannah Arendt and Jürgen Habermas, the notion of the public has remained central to a wide variety of debates in the humanities and social sciences. What is a public? How are publics constituted? What is the role of real and virtual space, architectural design, urban planning, and technical media, in the formation of publics? And, most centrally for our purposes, what role can and do the arts play in the emergence of various kinds of publics? The colloquium aspect of the course will involve visiting speakers from a variety of disciplines, both from the University of Chicago faculty, and from elsewhere.

MUSI 35015 "Lady Jane" in Warsaw: Communism Brought Down by Rock and Roll

KINGA KOSMALA

M/W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm, Cobb 201

Rock and punk music played a significant role in subverting the power of the Soviet system among the youth cultures of the Eastern bloc countries. These two types of music became extremely interesting artistic and subversive cultural realms during the Cold War in Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, and other countries of the Bloc. “The Plastic People of the Universe” from Czechoslovakia, “Maanam” and “Perfect” from Poland, “Time Machine” from the USSR, among others, accompanied and unified the younger generations in searching for their identity in the reality of the totally controlling and ominous communist state. Music became an integral part of young people’s lives and actively participated in the crucial social change of 1989 – the fall of the communist system. Massive popularity of Western rock and punk music behind the Iron Curtain along with the music created by artists from the Eastern Bloc will be explored in detail in this course.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): This course is a crosslist of POLI 32410.

MUSI 37100 Seminar: History of Music Theory 1

CALVIN BOWER

W 9:00 am - 11:50 am, JRL 264

 

MUSI 38914 Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter

DAVID LEVIN

T/R 3:00 - 4:20 pm, LC 701

In July, 2015, the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C Professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’s Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Cross listed with GRMN 28914/38914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, TAPS 28417.

MUSI 41000 Graduate Colloquium: Music

ANNE W. ROBERTSON

Time / Location by Arrangement

 

MUSI 41500 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

ROBERT KENDRICK

Time / Location by Arrangement

The goal of this seminar is to help doctoral students who have taken their Comprehensive Exams produce a dissertation proposal over the course of this academic year. The seminar meets every other week in Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. We will proceed from selecting and formulating a topic to planning and writing a proposal. Participants will regularly present abstracts, drafts, and versions of their proposal. Peer review will be an important part of the process.

MUSI 42915 Paradigm Shifting for New Understandings of Islamic Soundscapes

REGULA QURESHI

T 9:00 am - 11:50 am, JRL 264

Four Course topics will invite participants to situate themselves and their research in relation to the following themes from their own perspective. These topics will be adjusted to the research issues participants bring to the table. 

  • Ethnomusicology has a dual foundation of discourse and performance that matches religious texts and their oral–aural sonic articulation in Islamic and Islamicate rituals. Identified as recitation, its implications for secular music, and for mediated musical practices, complement and challenge Western interpretive categories. Can the negative Islamic position toward music challenge the paradigm of music study—as autonomous art, as culture, as language?
  • Acoustically, Islamic recitation is a sonic performance no less than music, but it is sound deeply anchored in the text and its message. This, I suggest, endows the sonic performance with the power of the word to act as catalyst between theory, exegesis, and embodied experience, bypassing mere sound. (Live) performance will be part of this exploration. Participants are invited to bring performance to these topics as part of their individual research. Close text-music analysis.
  • Challenges of Islamicate translation: Michael Sells’ seminal work informs my research in progress on poetry and on a unique 19th-Century Indian music treatise in Persianised-Urdu. Layered voices and contradictions of Persianate versus Devanagari terminologies and scripts challenge 21st-Century reception, understandings, including musical transcriptions.
  • Contradictions of gender: unlike religious reciters who perform for women, Muslim professional singers entertain men and are stigmatized even though their Islamicate vocal genres have high cultural value. What can gender experiences in different regions and religions add to the discussion? Proposing collaboration between researcher and subjects by interrogating performance as an act of agency and of performance as a tool of change.

MUSI 43214 Song, Track, Performance

STEVEN RINGS

M 9:00 am - 11:50 am, JRL 264

What kind of thing is a popular song? If the question feels too broad, consider another: What is the relationship between a song and a track—a studio recording in all of its acoustic specificity? From one perspective, a track might seem to exceed the song, manifesting a surplus of sonic detail not essential to the latter’s identity. But from another, song exceeds track, as an abstract entity (or script) that cannot be exhausted by any single, empirical manifestation. Consider, too, how these questions are sharpened or clarified by performance, broadly conceived. We speak of “performing a song,” but can we “perform a track”? Do we require multiple performances to develop a sense of a song qua song, independent of any of its individual instances? Or can we do this even if we hear it only as a single track? Finally, how might our answers to these questions shift across genres—R&B, country, hip hop, indie rock, tween pop, EDM (electronic dance music)? The last of these is instructive: the concept of song is problematic at best in EDM, but track is ascendant, and the idea of performance receives new technological inflections.

In this seminar we will explore the richly interlaced concepts of song, track, and performance in various mass-mediated popular music traditions. We will both seek to theorize these concepts “from the ground up”—drawing on the concrete practices and discourses of musicians, recordists, and fans—and to develop music-analytical methods that are responsive to them. We will explore what it might mean to analyze a song, a track, a performance, or some admixture of these. Readings will draw on scholarship in performance studies (Schechner, Worthen, Taylor), sound studies and recording technology (Sterne, Zak, Katz), ontologies of song and work (Gracyk, Goodman, Goehr), and popular music analysis (with a focus on Allan Moore’s new book). Our weekly work will tack between discussion of readings and close analytical engagement with recordings and live performances. Students will complete weekly analytical assignments and a final paper.

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