Autumn 2017 Courses

For up-to-date room assignments, visit classes.uchicago.edu

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 10100: Intro to Western Art Music

Barbara Dietlinger: T/R 12:30 - 1:50 GOH 402
Pierce Gradone: M/W 1:30 - 2:50 LC 901
Maria Jo Velasco: T/R 9:30 - 10:50, GOH 402

This one-quarter course is designed to enrich the listening experience of students, particularly with respect to the art music of the Western European and American concert tradition. Students are introduced to the basic elements of music and the ways that they are integrated to create works in various styles. Particular emphasis is placed on musical form and on the potential for music to refer to and interact with aspects of the world outside. 

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 10200: Intro to World Music

Mili Leitner: M/W 3:00 - 4:20 LC 901
Thalea Stokes: T/R 2:00 - 3:20 GOH 402

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored. 

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 10300: Intro to Music Materials/Design

Anthony Cheung: T/R 11:00 - 12:20, LC 901
Joungbum Lee: T/R 2:00 - 3:20, LC 901

This introductory course in music is intended for students who are interested in exploring the language, interpretation, and meaning of music through coordinated listening, analysis, and creative work. By listening to and comprehending the structural and aesthetic considerations behind significant written and improvised works, from the earliest examples of notated Western music to the music of living composers and performers, students will be prepared to undertake analytical and ultimately creative projects. The relationship between cultural and historical practices and the creation and reception of music will also be considered. The course is taught by a practicing composer, whose experience will guide and inform the works studied. No prior background in music is required.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 10400: Intro to Music Analysis/Criticism

John Lawrence: M/W/F 9:30 - 10:20, LC 901
Maxwell Silva: T/R 3:30 - 4:50, GOH 402

This course aims to develop students’ analytical and critical tools by focusing on a select group of works drawn from the Western European and American concert tradition. The texts for the course are recordings. Through listening, written assignments, and class discussion, we explore topics such as compositional strategy, conditions of musical performance, interactions between music and text, and the relationship between music and ideology as they are manifested in complete compositions.

Notes/Prerequisite(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class.

MUSI 15100: Harmony and Voice Leading I

Olga Sanchez Kisielewska: MWF 10:30-11:20
Olga Sanchez Kisielewska: MWF 11:30-12:20

Separate keyboard labs will meet: MW 1:30-2:20 OR TR 10:00-10:50 OR TR 11:00-11:50.

This three-quarter sequence serves as an introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal music. The first quarter focuses on fundamentals: scale types, keys, basic harmonic structures, voice-leading and two-voice counterpoint. The second quarter explores extensions of harmonic syntax, the basics of classical form, further work with counterpoint, and nondiatonic seventh chords. The third quarter undertakes the study of modulation, sequences, and additional analysis of classical forms. Musicianship labs in ear training and keyboard skills required.

MUSI 24000: Composition Lessons

Arranged with composition faculty.

MUSI 25801/31801: The Analysis of Song

Lawrence Zbikowski: TR 11:00 - 12:20 GOH 402

This course serves two functions: as a preparatory review for the topics covered in Music 31100 (Tonal Analysis), which will be offered in Winter term; and as an introduction to the nineteenth century Lied. These functions are associated with the two main goals of the course: to develop further students’ skills for analyzing and writing about tonal music; and to explore how words and music relate to one another in German vocal music of the early- to mid-nineteenth century. The composers whose songs on which we shall focus will include Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, and Johannes Brahms, although we shall certainly look at the works of other composers as occasion arises. Work for the course will include weekly assignments and four short analysis papers, the latter distributed fairly evenly across the term.

MUSI 26100: Intro to Composition

Marta Ptaszynska: M/W 4:30 - 5:50, GOH 205

MUSI 26718/36718: Approaches to Live Electronics

Sam Pluta: MW 1:30 - 2:50

Hand-built circuits, tape loops, feedback, filters, ring modulators, turntables, live-processing software environments, microphones, and human-machine interface designs. In this course, we will study current and historical approaches to the performative use of hardware and software environments in music, and will follow the practice as it continues to redefine music composition and improvisation in the 21st century. Study will be repertoire-based, drawing from the work of artists ranging from David Tudor to Herbie Hancock to Grandmaster Flash to Kaija Saariaho.

MUSI 27100: Topics: History of Western Music I

Martha Feldman: M/W 3:00 - 4:20, GOH 205

This sequence is a three-quarter investigation into Western art music, with primary emphasis on the vocal and instrumental repertories of Western Europe and the United States.

MUSI 28000: Undergraduate Conducting

James Kallembach: T/R 2:00 - 3:20, LC 703

2-quarter sequence.

MUSI 28500: Musicianship Skills​

Dan Wang F 1:30 - 2:20pm (Tentative Time) GOH 402

3-quarter sequence.


MUSIC ENSEMBLES


GRADUATE COURSES

MUSI 31516: Proseminar: Ethnomusicology Analysis

Bertie Kibreah: T 2:00 - 4:50 JRL 264

In this proseminar in analysis we examine the concepts and structures of mode that stretch from South Asia across the Middle East to the Mediterranean. We concentrate our comparative study on Arabic maqām, Turkish makam, Persian radif, North Indian/Hindustani rāga, and South Indian/Karnatak rāgam. Historically, processes and patterns of exchange between classical, popular, and folk musics in these regions have shaped repertories, ideas of melody and form, vocal practice and instrumental accompaniment, improvisation and composition, bearing witness to similarities and cross-influences, no less than to distinctive local and regional music cultures. To know and understand the music cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, as well as Muslim regions of Central and East Asia, it is indispensable also to understand the practices of improvisation and composition we analyze in this proseminar.

MUSI 25801/31801: The Analysis of Song

Lawrence Zbikowski: TR 11:00 - 12:20 GOH 402

This course serves two functions: as a preparatory review for the topics covered in Music 31100 (Tonal Analysis), which will be offered in Winter term; and as an introduction to the nineteenth century Lied. These functions are associated with the two main goals of the course: to develop further students’ skills for analyzing and writing about tonal music; and to explore how words and music relate to one another in German vocal music of the early- to mid-nineteenth century. The composers whose songs on which we shall focus will include Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, and Johannes Brahms, although we shall certainly look at the works of other composers as occasion arises. Work for the course will include weekly assignments and four short analysis papers, the latter distributed fairly evenly across the term.

MUSI 32618: Proseminar: Early Modern Europe 1600-1800

Robert L. Kendrick: M 1:30 - 4:20, JRL 264

This proseminar examines issues in European music from the late Renaissance to the French Revolution.  We explore changes in cultural context, music's role in late feudal society, expressions of gender and social class, and the development of specifically instrumental repertories in an art which continued to valorize vocality. Students work on both issues of cultural history and specific pieces as they examine music in early modern Europe.

MUSI 33000: Proseminar: Ethnomusicology

Travis Jackson: M 9:30 - 12:20 GOH JRL 264

This course’s goal is to introduce graduate students to the history, development and theoretical underpinnings of ethnomusicology as a research discipline.  In our readings, therefore, we will focus our attention on key figures and institutions, especially from the late 19th century forward; on major issues and debates in and beyond ethnomusicology; on the relationships between ethnomusicology and other research disciplines; and on emergent emphases and concerns in ethnomusicological work.

MUSI 33504: Introduction to World Music

Travis Jackson: T 9:30 - 12:20 GOH JRL 264

This course has two goals: (1) to introduce graduate students to the broad theoretical underpinnings of ethnomusicology as a research discipline and (2) to help students gain facility with the resources and perspectives that might enable them to teach a quarter- or semester-long undergraduate course on the musics of the world. As such, the readings and assignments focus on canonic materials and areas for ethnomusicological study including, but not limited to, major monographs, recorded collections and reference works examining the musics of East, Southeast and South Asia; Africa; Europe; and the Americas. Each student will be responsible for presenting brief overviews of key texts and recordings as well as devising two syllabi and a sample lecture outline by the end of the quarter.

MUSI 34100: Composition Seminar

Anthony Cheung: T 5:00 - 6:20, LC 901

MUSI 26718/36718: Approaches to Live Electronics

Sam Pluta: MW 1:30 - 2:50 

Hand-built circuits, tape loops, feedback, filters, ring modulators, turntables, live-processing software environments, microphones, and human-machine interface designs. In this course, we will study current and historical approaches to the performative use of hardware and software environments in music, and will follow the practice as it continues to redefine music composition and improvisation in the 21st century. Study will be repertoire-based, drawing from the work of artists ranging from David Tudor to Herbie Hancock to Grandmaster Flash to Kaija Saariaho.

MUSI 38000: Graduate Conducting

Barbara Schubert: R 2:00 - 4:00, GOH 205

This year-long course will provide a conceptual and practical introduction to the art, the craft, and the practice of orchestral conducting. The course is targeted particularly toward graduate students in Music Composition, but it is open to advanced musicians with orchestral performance experience as well. Ideally, students enrolled in the course should have had some experience playing or singing in a performance ensemble, and/or have a basic familiarity with orchestral instruments and traditional repertoire. Proficiency in sightreading, ear-training, and basic keyboard skills are prerequisites for the course, but will not be specifically included in the curriculum.

Through a combination of classroom work and extra ensemble sessions, the student will gain significant practical experience in conducting. Weekly classroom sessions will incorporate singing, keyboard work, and instrumental participation by class members and guest musicians. Important technical exercises will be assigned every week, along with moderate-length reading selections. Periodic ensemble sessions will involve small groups of eight to twelve players, and occasionally as many as twenty or thirty players. Several short papers and classroom presentations will be assigned each quarter, in conjunction with the assigned background readings and classroom work. In all, the goal is for each student to develop an understanding and appreciation of the serious responsibilities and the creative possibilities linked to the conductor’s role, as well as to promote a basic proficiency in the craft of conducting.

Autumn quarter work will focus on the practical and conceptual foundations of conducting: beating patterns, notation, conventions, and facility, as well as artistry, interpretation, and creativity on the podium. Winter quarter topics will include recitative, mixed meters, and rehearsal approach, as well as actual performance opportunities for each conductor. Spring quarter focus will extend to the challenges presented by 20th and 21st century repertoire, as well as historical perspective on the evolving role and responsibilities of both composer and conductor in musical performance.

The overall work load of the course is commensurate with a one-third course load per quarter. Class attendance and class participation are a crucial part of the work load, and of the final grade. Students receive course credit only upon completion of the entire year’s work. Students should register for the course in all three quarters; they will receive an 'R' in autumn and winter, and a final grade in the spring. Note: this course is required for all graduate students in Music Composition.

MUSI 41500: Dissertation Proposal Seminar

Robert Kendrick: W 3:00 - 5:50

MUSI 43718: Music and Agency

Lawrence Zbikowski: W 9:30 - 12:20 GOH JRL 264

During the past twenty years the topic of agency has increasingly occupied the attention of scholars, especially those interested in the ways social interactions shape the production of culture. Music, as a communicative medium that typically requires the cooperation of a range of actors distributed across space and time, poses particularly interesting problems for the study of agency. These problems include the way agency can be extended (through, for instance, a musical score, by means of which a composer shapes the actions of a performer), processes and situations through which agency is distributed (across, for instance, the members of a string quartet), and, most importantly for this seminar, the ways patterned nonlinguistic sound—that is, music—can be used to mediate or effect agency.

The seminar will engage with recent work that sets out a broad-based approach to agency (including contributions from Alfred Gell and writers on actor-network theory) as well as investigations of agency specific to music (from writers like Georgina Born, David Hesmondhalgh, Seth Monahan, Robert Hatten, and Edward Klorman). One of the aims of the seminar will be to better understand how the practice of music challenges and reframes notions of agency (focusing particularly on situations in which music provides the primary mode of interaction between individuals); another will be to explore, through the tools provided by musical analysis, the ways musical utterances shape the possibilities for agential interactions.

It is anticipated that the seminar will conclude with a micro-conference at the beginning of eleventh week, during which members of the seminar will offer short conference-style presentations on their research. Seminar papers (typically, a report of original research around 15–20 pages in length) must be turned in no later than March 1, 2018 or no grade for the seminar will be given.