Faculty

Chamber Music Intensive - Faculty 

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Spektral Quartet actively pursues a vivid conversation between exhilarating works of the traditional canon and those written this decade, this year, or this week. With the New York Times writing that “they have everything: a supreme technical command that seems to come easily, a capacity to make complicated music clear, and, most notably...an ability to cast a magic spell”, Spektral is known for creating seamless connections across centuries, drawing in the listener with charismatic deliveries, interactive concert formats, an up-close atmosphere, and bold, inquisitive programming.

Nominated for a 2017 GRAMMY award and named “Chicagoans of the Year 2017” by the Chicago Tribune, Spektral Quartet appears on the Sono Luminus, Azica Records, Nimbus Records, and Parlour Tapes+ labels, and is set to release a new album with saxophonist and MacArthur fellow Miguel Zenón in the summer of 2018. Recent residencies include Stanford University, New World Symphony, and Northwestern University, and the quartet is proud to serve as Ensemble-in-Residence at the University of Chicago’s Department of Music. Dubbed “The city’s hottest string quartet” by the Chicago Tribune, Spektral Quartet is committed to championing the work of Chicago composers around the world, and reaching new audiences within the city limits through its new partnership with Theaster Gates’s Rebuild Foundation.


Daniel Pesca, pianist and composer, is a passionate advocate for new music and a committed performer of the chamber music repertoire. Daniel has premiered over fifty solo and chamber works, many of which were composed for him. In the process, he has shared the stage with groups such as Ensemble Signal, Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Imani Winds, and Ensemble Dal Niente. He has recently performed at the Library of Congress, the Kennedy Center, Columbia University’s Miller Theatre, June in Buffalo, and festivals in Spain, Italy, and Greece.

This May, Daniel performs Bernstein’s Age of Anxiety with the University Symphony Orchestra here at UChicago. Among his past concerto credits are the Elliott Carter Double Concerto at Carnegie Hall, as well as solo appearances with the Orchestra of the League of Composers, the Slee Sinfonietta, the Eastman Wind Ensemble, and the Oberlin Sinfonietta.

Daniel is a co-director of the Zohn Collective, founded in 2017 with Hanna Hurwitz, Dieter Hennings, Tim Weiss, and Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. This season, Daniel will join the ensemble for several performances in Guadalajara, Mexico. The ensemble looks forward to the release of its first recording: a major song cycle by Zohn-Muldoon with soprano Tony Arnold. Daniel is featured on several other CDs—including Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez’s piano concerto Diaries, dedicated to Daniel.

Daniel has an eleven-year musical partnership with flutist Sarah Frisof. Their duo has performed over forty recitals, at venues such as the Interlochen Center for the Arts, the Arts Club of Washington, the Dame Myra Hess concerts in Chicago, and at many universities and conservatories. Their recording of the music of Joseph Schwantner was released on Centaur Records in July 2016.

Daniel is artist-in-residence and director of the Chamber Music Program at UChicago. He holds a doctorate from Eastman, where he led a class on contemporary keyboard music for four years and studied piano with Nelita True. He counts Robert Morris, David Liptak, and Betsy Jolas among his composition mentors, and he has taken lessons and masterclasses with Hans Abrahamsen, Chaya Czernowin, and Louis Andriessen.


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Violinist Lucy Chapman has pursued an eclectic career spanning many musical worlds. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, where she studied with Arnold Steinhardt of the Guarneri Quartet, she became Acting Associate Concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony at the age of twenty-nine; from that position, she moved on to play two seasons as first violin of the award-winning Muir String Quartet. She played solo and chamber music concerts throughout the USA, Europe, Korea, and Japan. Her recording of Bartok, Stravinsky, and Ives with clarinetist Richard Stoltzman and pianist Richard Goode won a Grammy nomination, and she also recorded with Keith Jarrett, whose solo sonata she premiered in Chicago’s Orchestra Hall.

Ms Chapman is a former faculty member at the University of California at Santa Cruz, Boston University, Harvard University, and the New England Conservatory, where she served for many years as Chair of the Chamber Music and Strings. She has participated in summer programs at Kneisel Hall in Blue Hill, Maine, and is a regular senior participant at the Marlboro Music Festival in Marlboro, Vermont. Chapman holds a Masters degree in Education from the Antioch New England Graduate School, where she specialized in Waldorf Education.

Ms. Chapman has recently moved full-time to Vermont, where she continues performing and teaching privately, and also helps her daughter run an organic farm.


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Sarah Edgar specializes in eighteenth century stage performance. She began her professional career as a dancer with The New York Baroque Dance Company under Catherine Turocy, and since then she has voraciously studied and experimented with the stage conventions of the period. She is now an associate director of The New York Baroque Dance Company and the stage director/choreographer at Haymarket Opera Company in Chicago. With Haymarket Opera Company, she recently directed the modern premiere of Marin Marais’ Ariane et Bachus.

From 2006-2012, Sarah lived in Köln, Germany, and she visited all the museums, castles, and gardens in Europe that she could manage while still dancing in operas, creating new works with her group The Punk’s Delight, and receiving an MA in Tanzwissenschaft (dance studies) from the Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln.

She is also frequently asked to give master classes in baroque dance and direct/choreograph operas at universities.

This program has been made possible in part with support from ACMP Associated Chamber Music Players.